Roca, Inc.

At a Glance

National Office: 
101 Park Street
Chelsea, MA 02150
Phone: 617-889-5210

Molly Baldwin
People Served: 
866
Year Founded: 
1988
Tax ID: 
22-3223641

Focus area(s):

Job/Career Development
Economic Development

Description

Roca is an outcomes-driven organization focused helping our communities' highest risk, disengaged young people move out of violence and poverty, ultimately reducing incarcerations.   Roca's cognitive behavioral intervention model engages court, street, gang, and drug-involved 17-24 year-old young men to change their destructive behaviors, develop critical skills and get jobs.

Impact and Outcomes

Roca served 659 very high risk young men in FY 15, with a retention rate of 84%
84% of young men enrolled 21 months or longer retained employment for at least 6 months
93% of young men in the last two years of the Intervention Model had no new arrests
98% of young men in the last two years of the Intervention Model had no new incarcerations

Mission & Goals

Roca’s mission is to disrupt the cycle of incarceration and poverty by helping young people transform their lives. Our evidence-based Intervention Model engages the highest-risk 17-24 year olds in a long term process of behavior change and skill building opportunities. By providing two years of intensive engagement and two years of less intensive follow-up, Roca’s Intervention Model provides a robust combination of services, including relentless street outreach, data-driven case management, stage- based education and employment training.

We focus our efforts on two groups of young people – young men trapped in cycles of crime and incarceration, and young mothers with a multitude of risk factors. Ultimately, our goal is to help these young people get off the street, reduce their involvement in crime, stay out of jail and get jobs.

Roca’s work is based upon the theory that young people, when re-engaged through positive and intensive relationships, can change their behaviors and develop life, education, and employment skills to disrupt the cycles of poverty and incarceration. Our Intervention Model is a cognitive-behavioral intervention based on the evidence-based practices of community corrections. It is the only community corrections model that is delivered on the street, for high-risk young people, by a non-mandated authority. It is this solution that Roca seeks to scale.

Program

Informed by evidence-based practices from cognitive-behavioral therapy, community corrections, motivational interviewing, transitional employment, and promising/best practices from restorative justice and re-entry, Roca’s Intervention Model has four core components:

·        Relentless Outreach: We never give up on young people, no matter how hard it gets.  The highest-risk young people will not show up at Roca’s doors, no matter how long we wait. So we go out and find them on the streets and where they hang out. It is the relentlessness of a youth worker who keeps showing up, day after day, no matter what, that slowly awakens hope in a young person, even when they have disengaged from programming or relapsed into destructive behaviors.

 

·        Transformational Relationships:We build relationships with high-risk young people for the purpose of change. Young people change in the context of relationships. Roca’s 27 years of experience and extensive program data show that intensive, long-term relationships with responsible adult Youth Workers and other staff members help even the highest-risk young people change destructive behaviors and build employment, education, and life skills over four years. Roca utilizes Transformational Relationships as an intensive form of case management.

 

·        Stage-based/Skill-based Programming: We meet young people where they are, cognitively and behaviorally. All of Roca’s programming is designed to withstand the comings and goings of high-risk young people who have failed in traditional learning environments. Our life skills, educational, pre-vocational, and employment programming are offered in varying informal and formal structures (from repeat drop-in sessions to full certificate courses) to allow young people at varying stages of readiness to learn critical skills as they progress through the Intervention Model.

 

·        Engaged Institutions: We engage intentionally, respectfully, and effectively with the organizations and systems that touch the lives of high-risk young people. Understanding that we cannot and should not do this work alone, Roca collaborates with an important array of leaders and institutions from the criminal justice field, government, business and social service sectors to create systemic improvements in the way our society responds to the crises of crime, poverty, and over-incarceration of young people. 

Impact

Project Outcomes to Date: Roca’s historical outcomes show a robust model that is continually improving: In 2012, 90% of participants in the follow up and retention phase of Roca’s model had no new arrests, increasing to 93% in 2015; in 2012, 79% of participants retained employment, increasing to 92% in 2015. Roca’s Intervention Model offers a profound solution to the destructive cycle of poverty, violence, and incarceration that can affect youth and young adults for the rest of their lives.

Internal Evaluation and Commitment to Performance Based Management: At Roca, we know that good intentions don’t always produce good results. If we are not helping young people stay out of jail and get jobs, then we might as well close our doors. So we’ve spent the better part of the last decade developing an Intervention Model that focuses on results first. Weekly, monthly, quarterly, and annually, Roca tracks and evaluates data regarding participant progress and staff performance, using this data to affect continuous improvement.

Roca tracks participant outcomes through its Efforts to Outcomes (ETO) software, a customizable data collection system, which allows each organization to track and measure components of their approaches to engagement and youth participation in programming.

ETO captures movement toward the out-of-harm’s-way outcome through tracking the development of the transformational relationship over time and through tracking the stages of change related to specific behavior change outcomes.  Roca utilizes a range of outcomes focused on young people living out of harm’s way and moving towards economic self-sufficiency.  Youth workers select appropriate outcomes to focus on with young people based on their individual issues and barriers to success. 

Behavior change outcomes examine substance abuse, educational engagement, employment engagement, unhealthy relationships, pregnancy prevention, court compliance, street/gang Involvement, etc.  These outcomes are measured by examining program attendance, program retention, school attendance, overall educational gains, academic skill gains, pre-vocational skill achievements, progress in transitional employment programming, job placement, and job retention and advancement.  

Growth Plan

Growth Plan

Goal 1: Demonstrate impact and scale programming for very high-risk young mento avert futureincarcerations.

As mass incarceration in the United States reaches internationally unprecedented rates, Rocatakes  prideinitsabilitytodeliveraneffectiveInterventionModelspeciallydesignedforthehighest-riskyoung men with criminal justice involvement. While the majority of criminal justice reform efforts todayfocus oncreatingalternativesforlow-andmoderate-riskoffenders,Roca’smodelintentionallytargetsyoung people at highest risk to reoffend and recidivate, helping to reduce re-incarceration by connectingthem to social supports, employment training, and economicopportunities. It is this solution that Roca seeks to scale.

STRATEGIES:

 

A.      Implement the Massachusetts Juvenile Justice Pay for Success Project and expand servicesin Massachusetts

B.      Demonstrate higher level of evidence for the interventionmodel

C.      Replicate in anotherstate

D.      Develop long term plan for scale andimpact

 

Goal 2: Demonstrate a national intervention model for very high risk young mothers, helping them move out of poverty.

Roca’s work to disrupt the cycle of poverty doesn’t begin or end with young men. Since 1988, Rocahas remained committed to helping the most vulnerable young mothers in our society overcomedestructive patterns of unemployment, isolation, domestic violence, homelessness and family instability.TodayRoca has created an adapted dual-generation Intervention Model for our communities’ highestrisk young mothers. We have developed a comprehensive plan over the next five years to not onlyexpand thismodelbutalsotocodifyit,evaluateitanddemonstratethatitcanserveasacriticalsolutionforthe highest-risk young mothers and children left out of traditionalprogramming.

STRATEGIES:

 

A.      Expand programming in MA for the highest risk youngmothers.

B.      Develop and implement an engaged institutions strategy for work with very high riskyoung mothers.

C.      Demonstrate effectiveness of the Intervention Model for high risk youngmothers.

Location of Sites

National Office: 
101 Park Street
Chelsea, MA 02150
Phone: 617-889-5210
List of locations

To make a contribution to a program site:

  1. Click on the "Make a Contribution Now" button and include the name, city and state of the program you would like to support, in the "notes" text box on the organization's donation form, if available.
  2. If a "notes" or "designation" box is not available, write the city and state on your check in the "notes" section or call the national office to designate your contribution to a local program site.

Locations in the following states:

Massachusetts

Financials

Most Recent Budget

Year Ended:

2016

REVENUE

Corporate Grants: 
$1,150,862
Foundation Grants: 
$4,235,359
Government Funding: 
$2,052,829
Contributions from Individuals: 
$243,607
Special Events: 
$565,377
Program Services Fees: 
$0
Membership Dues: 
$0
Other Earned Income: 
$876,576
Other Revenue: 
$4,361,675
Other Revenue (Description): 
other revenue pfs-3,822,038 other revenue interest and dividends-125,864 other revenue in kind donations-413,773
Total Revenue: 
$13,486,285

EXPENSES

Salaries, Related Salaries & Professional Fees: 
$8,252,501
Occupancy: 
$562,159
Travel & Entertainment: 
$72,127
Office Supplies, Printing, Postage: 
$157,787
Telephone & Communications: 
$104,709
Payments to Affiliates: 
$0
Other Expenses: 
$1,511,346
Other Expenses (Description): 
Other - Legal $149,959
Other - Vehicle $433,787
Other - Program Supplies/materials $402,974
Other - Insurance $72,497
Other - Advertising & Event $92,684
Other - Depreciation $176,843
Other - Misc & Bad Debt $182,602
   
Other Expenses (Description): 

Total Expenses: 
$10,660,629

NET GAIN/LOSS

Net Gain/Loss: 
$2,825,656

Prior Year Actuals

Year Ended:

2015

REVENUE

Corporate Grants: 
$134,364
Foundation Grants: 
$3,530,918
Government Funding: 
$2,010,545
Contributions from Individuals: 
$116,751
Program Services Fees: 
$0
Membership Dues: 
$0
Other Earned Income: 
$882,818
Other Revenue: 
$3,281,229
Other Revenue (Description): 
Other Revenue - PFS $2,822,932 Other Revenue - Interest & Dividends $111,340 Other Revenue - In kind Donations $346,957
Special Events: 
$523,598
Total Revenue: 
$10,480,223

EXPENSES

Salaries, Related Salaries & Professional Fees: 
$7,322,320
Occupancy: 
$502,652
Travel & Entertainment: 
$110,678
Office Supplies, Printing, Postage: 
$113,684
Telephone & Communication: 
$98,094
Payments to Affiliates: 
$0
Other Expenses: 
$1,315,769
Other Expenses (Description): 
Other - Legal $149,628
Other - Vehicle $351,032
Other - Program Supplies/materials $333,999
Other - Insurance $66,903
Other - Advertising & Event $77,440
Other - Depreciation $151,827
Other - Misc & Bad Debt $184,940
   
Total Expenses: 
$9,463,197

NET GAIN/LOSS

Net Gain / Loss: 
$1,017,026

Major Funders

Roca's major funders include government funders such as the U.S. Department of Labor, Department of Health and Human Services, the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, the Massachusetts Department of Children and Families, the Massachusetts Executive Office of Public Safety and Security, the City of Chelsea, the City of Springfield, the City of Boston, the City of Lynn, and a variety of other public funding sources. 

Roca has also developed extensive support from the foundation and corporate community, with support from over 50 foundations and corporate giving programs, including support from MassMutual Life Insurance Co., the Kresge Foundation, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Barr Foundation, the Peter and Elizabeth C. Tower Foundation, the Hyams Foundation,  State Street Foundation, United Way, Klarman Family Foundation, People's United Community Foundation, the Irene E. and George A. Davis Foundation, Bennett Family Foundation, the Roy A. Hunt Foundation, and many more.

In addition, Roca is the primary service provider for the Massachusetts Juvenile Justice Pay for Success Project, a nine-year performance based contracting arrangement with the Commonwealth, launched in 2014. Through quarterly payments provided by Youth Services, Inc (the project’s financial intermediary), and payments for positive outcomes for young men (reduced incarceration rates and increased employment rates) at the end of the project, Roca is able to serve an estimated 1,000 criminal justice system involved young men over nine years from 21 communities in Massachusetts.