PROSPER Partnership Network

At a Glance

National Office: 
2625 North Loop Drive Suite 2400
Ames, IA 50010-8296
Phone: 515-294-5383

Richard L. Spoth
People Served: 
9,060
Year Founded: 
2011
Tax ID: 
42-6004224

Focus area(s):

After-School & Out-of-School
Personal & Leadership Development
Mental Health

Description

PROSPER (PROmoting School-community-university Partnerships to Enhance Resilience) is a proven system for delivering and sustaining high quality evidence-based programs resulting in increased youth competencies, reduced youth problem behaviors, and stronger families. The PROSPER Network Organization is an outgrowth of research conducted by Partnerships in Prevention Science Institute at Iowa State University (current fiscal agent) in collaboration with the Prevention Research Center at Penn State. This organization coordinates the efforts of all states that are implementing this system and provides them with ongoing training and technical assistance to maximize youth, family and community impact.                                     [[http://www.prosper.ppsi.iastate.edu]]

Impact and Outcomes

Youth in programs on the PROSPER menu show long-term reductions in substance misuse.
Youth in programs on the PROSPER menu show reduced behavior problems.
Youth in programs on the PROSPER menu show long-term positive effects on academic success.
Youth in programs on the PROSPER menu show long-term reductions in lifetime STD rates.
Families in PROSPER communities report increased family cohesion and well-being.
Parents in PROSPER communities have enhanced relationship skills.
PROSPER community teams reach more families to participate in programs.
PROSPER community teams find resources to sustain programming long-term.
PROSPER is cost effective and PROSPER programs show economic benefits.
The PROSPER Model reduces costs for delivering the Strengthening Familiies Program: For Parents and Youth 10-14 by approximately 60% compared to traditional program delivery approaches.

Mission & Goals

The vision of the PROSPER Network Organization is to establish a national network of state prevention systems and community partnerships that sustain the most effective programs for promoting positive youth development and strong families.

The mission of the Network Organization is to promote the use of evidence-based programs by community teams. These teams are facilitated by partnerships among the Land Grant University's Cooperative Extension System, public education systems, and other youth and family serving partners. 

The goal of the Network Organization is to build a network of 15 states over the next six years. After the Network Organization has increased its capacity to support this work, groups of five states will begin the process of implementation until all 15 states are well-established. At that point, all Network states will continue to grow and expand into new PROSPER communities each year to reach more youth and families.

Program

The PROSPER Partnership Model is an evidence-based delivery system with five core components. The PROSPER Partnership Model was developed by researchers at Iowa State University's Partnerships in Prevention Science Institute in collaboration with researchers at Pennsylvania State University's Prevention Research Center as part of their focus on innovative projects that promote capable and healthy youth, families, and communities. Research on the Model has shown that programs implemented in this fashion are delivered with higher quality, reach more people, and are less expensive to implement. 

The Model uses community teams to implement programs from the PROSPER menu of evidence-based programs. Teams move through a developmental process that promotes long-term program sustainability. They receive proactive technical assistance from their state partnership and use on-going evaluation data to ensure quality programming. 

PROSPER links university expertise with community teams using the Cooperative Extension System found at the Land Grant University in every state. These Extension-led teams have expertise in disseminating educational programs and partner with their public school, which has access to youth and families. PROSPER community teams are successful because they have access to the latest research from the university, benefit from the expertise and consistent support of the Extension System, and are able to reach most of the youth and families in the community.

Just as community teams benefit from the support they receive from their state partnership, each state receives ongoing assistance from the National PROSPER Network Organization. The Network helps states build capacity to sustain the Model and integrate it into their Extension System. They provide coaching, training, technical assistance, and monitor quality until the Model becomes established as a way of doing business in the state. 

Impact

The Network currently has five states with a total of 29 communities. An estimated 9,060 youth and 1,812 families receive programming each year across these communities.

Over a period of 23 years, the PROSPER Partnership Model evolved from a series of projects that served a wide range of groups and entailed evaluations measuring a number of outcomes. The evidence-based programs on the PROSPER menu also have served numerous people and have been evaluated in multiple scientifically rigorous studies.

The PROSPER research project, a randomized control trial, involved 11,600 youth and their families from 28 communities in Iowa and Pennsylvania. Half of the communities were randomly assigned to receive PROSPER programming, while the rest were assigned to a waitlist control group. [[http://www.prosper.ppsi.iastate.edu/default.asp?background|Click here to learn more about the research project]]

Scientists found that PROSPER improved youth skills, reduced youth problem behaviors and enhanced family functioning. It also improved peer networks (substance misusers were less influential), and enhanced community social capital. Finally, its economic benefits were in evidence. For example, researchers estimate a 57-69% reduction in the cost of implementing the family program using this Model compared with the cost of delivering the same family program using traditional approaches.

PROSPER community teams implemented programs with high quality and sustained implementation quality over time. They also secured funding to continue delivering their programs year after year. 

In addition, a series of earlier studies showed a wide range of positive outcomes from the programs on the PROSPER menu. For example, youth reported 40% reduction in the likelihood of being drunk by 10th grade; 40% fewer aggressive and destructive behaviors by 10th grade, and long-term positive effects on academic success (e.g., higher GPA). Youth were 23% less likely to report having depressive symptoms than their non-intervention counterparts and 71% less likely to have STDs by age 21.

See Attachments section for additional results from PROSPER-related research.

Growth Plan

Economic Model.

Each Network state Extension system is asked to cover its own staffing and infrastructure costs which includes: community Team Leaders (one for each community site), Prevention Coordinators (one for each community site), and a Management Team at the state level, which oversees the effort and coordinates with the Network Organization. To date, each Network state has been able to reallocate staff time to fill these roles. PROSPER community teams work toward developing sustainability over a period of three to four years to pay for ongoing program implementation and recruitment efforts. In the beginning however, PROSPER community teams require initial programming support to cover training and implementation costs. As the Model becomes integrated into the Extension system, sustainability costs are expected to be covered locally and through state partnerships with other state level public systems (e.g., Depts. of Health, Human Services, Education or Juvenile Justice).

The Network Organization incurs actual costs associated with the provision of training, ongoing technical assistance, and monitoring services to each Network state. The Network Organization would like to minimize fees to Network states, recognizing their budgetary limitations and the fact that these organizations make a significant investment within their system to implement the PROSPER Model. Given this, Network states will be asked to pay only 25% of Network Organization fees, leaving the remaining 75%, plus the additional Network Organization Infrastructure costs associated with supporting each state left to be covered by other sources.

Growth Plan. 

To implement its growth plan, the PROSPER Network Organization requires $12,060,125, which includes the costs of the Network Organization to provide support to Network states as specified in the six-year growth plan, as well as costs related to programming and Network state infrastructure to implement the PROSPER Model. In addition to this amount, Network states will contribute approximately $12,053,125 to the effort in the form of in-kind staff time and a small proportion of Network Organization fees over the six years. The plan is to use the financial support generated from this campaign to increase the number of Network states to 15 and the number of community sites within these states to a total of 139. It is estimated that this scale-up plan will facilitate the delivery of evidence-based programming to up to 55,600 youth (an increase of 514% in the number of youth served), with a similar proportional increase in the number of families served (up to 11,120) across the 15 Network states.

The Network’s growth plan involves: (a) adding new Network states, and (b) adding new community sites in existing Network states. Existing Network states may add anywhere between 2-4 community sites per year. Each new state begins with a one-to-two year capacity-building phase and moves on to a pilot implementation phase with 2-3 community sites. The capacity-building phase serves as a time to explore potential partnerships and co-funding opportunities within each Network state. After a state has been implementing the PROSPER Model for several years, sustainability and expansion within the state will become more cost effective and require less funding.

The Network Organization is currently developing a funding plan with the Annie E. Casey Foundation to support the Network Infrastructure and the scale-up of individual states. The plan includes staff time and other resources necessary to provide training and ongoing technical assistance with states in the Network. For scale up, the Network Organization is working to develop a systematic process for engaging state agencies, which will help to align state agency priorities with Model outcomes and impact so that public dollars can be used to support implementation in Network states. The Network Organization also will focus on building its own internal capacity to support new Network states, including training of new state coaches and evaluators.

Location of Sites

National Office: 
2625 North Loop Drive Suite 2400
Ames, IA 50010-8296
Phone: 515-294-5383
List of locations

To make a contribution to a program site:

  1. Click on the "Make a Contribution Now" button and include the name, city and state of the program you would like to support, in the "notes" text box on the organization's donation form, if available.
  2. If a "notes" or "designation" box is not available, write the city and state on your check in the "notes" section or call the national office to designate your contribution to a local program site.

Locations in the following states:

Alabama

Iowa

New York

Pennsylvania

Vermont

Financials

Most Recent Budget

Year Ended:

2013

REVENUE

Corporate Grants: 
$0
Foundation Grants: 
$142,804
Government Funding: 
$2,670,272
Contributions from Individuals: 
$0
Special Events: 
$0
Program Services Fees: 
$44,043
Membership Dues: 
$0
Other Earned Income: 
$0
Other Revenue: 
$0
Total Revenue: 
$2,857,119

EXPENSES

Salaries, Related Salaries & Professional Fees: 
$737,130
Occupancy: 
$482,147
Travel & Entertainment: 
$37,996
Office Supplies, Printing, Postage: 
$7,228
Telephone & Communications: 
$420
Payments to Affiliates: 
$1,203,794
Other Expenses: 
$388,404
Other Expenses (Description): 

Other Expenses: Expenses associated with conducting research and evaluation activities such as data collection, participant incentives, and related equipment and materials.

Please note: 

  • For context, over 70 million dollars has been invested in the partnership-based program delivery research that evolved into the PROSPER system during the last 23 years; this has included recent pilot scale-up projects over the last 3 years, totaling to approximately $4,486,000.

Total Expenses: 
$2,857,119

NET GAIN/LOSS

Net Gain/Loss: 
$0

Prior Year Actuals

Year Ended:

2012

REVENUE

Corporate Grants: 
$0
Foundation Grants: 
$168,000
Government Funding: 
$2,832,968
Contributions from Individuals: 
$0
Program Services Fees: 
$0
Membership Dues: 
$0
Other Earned Income: 
$0
Other Revenue: 
$0
Special Events: 
$0
Total Revenue: 
$3,000,968

EXPENSES

Salaries, Related Salaries & Professional Fees: 
$939,869
Occupancy: 
$648,110
Travel & Entertainment: 
$20,141
Office Supplies, Printing, Postage: 
$93,618
Telephone & Communication: 
$0
Payments to Affiliates: 
$854,765
Other Expenses: 
$460,169
Other Expenses (Description): 

Other Expenses: Expenses associated with conducting research and evaluation activities such as data collection, participant incentives, and related equipment and materials.

Total Expenses: 
$3,016,672

NET GAIN/LOSS

Net Gain / Loss: 
$-15,704

Major Funders

Each funder for work initiated this year is named followed by a brief description of how the funding is intended to be used.

  1. The Annie E. Casey Foundation - is providing funding to help build internal Network capacity, develop funding models to finance sustained implementation in states, and build communication and strategic plans for scale-up.
  2. Contracted fees for services are a second income source with the primary Extension Systems being those from New York and Vermont.

Over the course of several years and multiple projects, researchers and other staff received funds from a variety of sources to conduct the research that led to the development and evaluation of the PROSPER Partnership Model. These funders have included:

  • The Annie E. Casey Foundation,
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  • The National Institute on Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse
  • The National The National Institute on Drug Abuse
  • The National Institute of Mental Health
  • The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration