Network for Teaching Entrepreneurship

At a Glance

National Office: 
120 Wall Street, 18th Floor
New York , NY 10128
Phone: 212 232 3333

Amy Rosen
People Served: 
65,000
Year Founded: 
1987
Tax ID: 
13-3408731

Focus area(s):

Personal & Leadership Development
Mentoring
Reading/Math

Description

The Network for Teaching Entrepreneurship (NFTE) provides programs that inspire young people from low-income communities to stay in school, to recognize career opportunities, and to plan for successful futures.

Impact and Outcomes

NFTE students have a greater interest in attending college (32% increase vs. 17% decrease for comparison group)
NFTE students have higher career aspirations (44% increase vs. 10% increase for comparison group)
NFTE students in Baltimore were found to have significantly higher math and reading scores on Maryland School Assessment tests.

Mission & Goals

The Network for Teaching Entrepreneurship provides programs that inspire young people from low-income communities to stay in school, to recognize business opportunity and to plan for successful futures.  The organization’s vision is that all young people can find their own path to success.  The young people who participate in NFTE have been proven to have higher self-expectations related to attending college and the types of careers they plan to pursue.  The primary intended outcome for NFTE students is high school graduation as well as demonstrated improvement on other leading indicators such as attendance, behavior, promotion rates and standardized test scores, especially in math.  Highly motivated NFTE students are also given support to launch and sustain their own businesses.  

Program

NFTE’s program model has three components.  First, NFTE publishes an award winning high school entrepreneurship curriculum, recipient of AEP’s Distinguished Achievement Award for Math, Grades 9-12, in 2010. 

Second, NFTE trains public-school teachers to deliver the curriculum in a 60+ hour classroom setting.    NFTE takes teachers through the entire curriculum focusing on key entrepreneurship concepts, their link to core academics and the experiential activities that bring the curriculum to life.  NFTE provides ongoing professional development to teachers reinforcing key concepts and introducing new ways to illustrate them.

Most important is the classroom support services that bring the “real world” to students and takes them into the real world.  NFTE staff visits each classroom 3-5 times per semester, working directly with the students and teachers.  In addition, staff bring volunteers to the classroom as guest speakers, to coach the students in developing their business plan – the core of the curriculum – and to act as competition judges.  NFTE also provides students with a small grant to participate in the buying and selling activity.  This allows students to make their first profit in their NFTE class and shows how entrepreneurship, learned well and applied creatively, can change the course of students’ futures.

Impact

Annually, NFTE serves 50,000 young people in low-income communities worldwide, including 20,000 in America. 

NFTE partnered with the Harvard Graduate School of Education to examine how participation affects two high school graduation research-validated inputs: educational expectations and occupational aspirations. The study analyzed data collected during the 2001-2 school year from 312 students (158 NFTE and 154 comparison students) in two Boston high schools. NFTE students’ interest in attending college increased 32% (compared to a 17% decrease for non-NFTE students).  Occupational aspirations among NFTE students increased 44% (compared to a 10% increase for non-NFTE students).

Other research establishes the role of educational expectations and occupational aspirations in educational attainment and high school graduation. Ou and Reynolds (2008) investigated predictors of high school completion and years of completed education for youth in the Chicago Longitudinal Study, using data from 1,286 low-income, minority youth in high-poverty neighborhoods. The authors found that youth’s educational expectations were one of the strongest predictors of educational attainment. Beale and Crockett (2010) surveyed 317 subjects from a rural community three times from high school into early adulthood finding that adolescents’ occupational aspirations and educational expectations predicted adult educational attainment.

In 2010, NFTE collaborated with the Baltimore City Public School System to analyze data for all 2009-10 school year NFTE students against a control group of demographically and academically similar students.  NFTE participants performed better on the Maryland School Assessment (MSA) tests.

  1. In math, 51% of NFTE participants performed at the proficient and advanced levels, compared to 27% of non-participants.
  2. In reading, 74% of NFTE participants performed at the proficient and advanced levels, compared to 52% of non-participants.
  3. Additionally, the average NFTE participant was absent approximately 14 days in the 2009-10 school year, compared to an average of approximately 19 absence days for nonparticipants.

Growth Plan

Over the coming five years, NFTE will be focusing on scaling our domestic program offices.  Partner (independent NGOs holding a NFTE program license) expansion, both domestically and internationally, will only be opportunistic. 

NFTE’s current economic model is heavily reliant on contributed income (80%) mostly from corporate, foundation and a small group of major donors, as well as events.  While NFTE is fortunate to have a committed group of donors, it recognizes the need to diversify its income streams to better spread risk.  Therefore, Board and staff are developing strategies and investing resources to diversify its revenue streams and build a more significant endowment fund (currently $8 million).  These include its focus on government affairs to have entrepreneurship education recognized in ESEA legislation and a committee of its Board leading a full analysis of its assets and how to possibly monetize them in the commercial space.  The Founder is leading the effort to increase the endowment fund with a goal of the fund growing to at least $25 million.  

NFTE’s growth plan calls for an increase in students served by program offices sites from 16,000 annually to 56,450 in five years.  This expansion will require nearly $20 million in growth capital which NFTE intends to fund through a combination of sustained, but modest, contributions growth; significant growth in earned income; accessing untapped government resources; and modest growth in our endowment fund distributions. 

The overall goals for NFTE’s expansion plan are as follows:

  • Increased students served through domestic program offices by 250%
  • 5 new program sites including Newark, Detroit, Houston, New Orleans and a site in CA TBD.
  • Significant expansion in our three strongest current sites: New York City, Baltimore, and Chicago.
  • Significant expansion in LA due to the nature of the need and size of school district.
  • Program expansion in charter schools.
  • Sustained growth in the Career and Technical Education space.
  • Leverage California state economics requirement to scale NFTE.     
  • Invest in research to demonstrate entrepreneurship education’s impact on high school graduation and its leading indicators.
  • Create district partnerships to regularly secure NFTE and comparison group data.
  • Launch multi-region high school graduation outcomes study.
  • Strengthen ongoing program and student assessments.  
  • Build on NFTE’s recognized leadership role in the field of entrepreneurship education.
  • Create a digital community for NFTE educators and any other educators seeking to leverage the power of entrepreneurship in their classrooms.
  • Lead Entrepreneurship for All coalition to educate policy makers on the field’s impact.
  •   Create a more sustainable financial model for NFTE.
  • Invest in earned income extensions of NFTE’s core assets.
  • Access government resources available to support NFTE’s program and outcomes.
  • Create an operating reserve fund and expanded endowment fund.

Location of Sites

National Office: 
120 Wall Street, 18th Floor
New York , NY 10128
Phone: 212 232 3333
List of locations

To make a contribution to a program site:

  1. Click on the "Make a Contribution Now" button and include the name, city and state of the program you would like to support, in the "notes" text box on the organization's donation form, if available.
  2. If a "notes" or "designation" box is not available, write the city and state on your check in the "notes" section or call the national office to designate your contribution to a local program site.

Locations in the following states:

No results found.

Financials

Most Recent Budget

Year Ended:

2013

REVENUE

Corporate Grants: 
$5,268,895
Foundation Grants: 
$3,131,811
Government Funding: 
$95,019
Contributions from Individuals: 
$3,404,981
Special Events: 
$1,073,483
Program Services Fees: 
$593,877
Membership Dues: 
$0
Other Earned Income: 
$273,264
Other Revenue: 
$725,375
Other Revenue (Description): 
Teacher in-kind services, contributed software and services, endowment distribution
Total Revenue: 
$14,566,705

EXPENSES

Salaries, Related Salaries & Professional Fees: 
$10,059,526
Occupancy: 
$788,174
Travel & Entertainment: 
$619,995
Office Supplies, Printing, Postage: 
$130,598
Telephone & Communications: 
$522,526
Payments to Affiliates: 
$266,883
Other Expenses: 
$3,057,014
Other Expenses (Description): 

Student Expenses, Teacher Expenses, Costs of materials, in-kind teacher expenses and services, marketing, event expenses, publications, bad debt, insurance, depreciation, amortization

Other Expenses (Description): 

Total Expenses: 
$15,444,716

NET GAIN/LOSS

Net Gain/Loss: 
$-878,011

Prior Year Actuals

Year Ended:

2012

REVENUE

Corporate Grants: 
$4,598,307
Foundation Grants: 
$3,774,068
Government Funding: 
$133,742
Contributions from Individuals: 
$1,415,985
Program Services Fees: 
$310,451
Membership Dues: 
$0
Other Earned Income: 
$225,482
Other Revenue: 
$476,197
Other Revenue (Description): 
Teacher in-kind services, contributed software and services, endowment distribution
Special Events: 
$2,598,508
Total Revenue: 
$13,532,740

EXPENSES

Salaries, Related Salaries & Professional Fees: 
$8,532,168
Occupancy: 
$747,361
Travel & Entertainment: 
$667,530
Office Supplies, Printing, Postage: 
$139,606
Telephone & Communication: 
$525,685
Payments to Affiliates: 
$15,000
Other Expenses: 
$3,095,807
Other Expenses (Description): 

Student Expenses, Teacher Expenses, Costs of materials, in-kind teacher expenses and services, marketing, event expenses, publications, bad debt, insurance, depreciation, amortization

Total Expenses: 
$13,723,157

NET GAIN/LOSS

Net Gain / Loss: 
$-190,417

Major Funders

Mr. Dwight Anderson Bank of America Charitable Foundation

The Batchelor Foundation

Bright China Social Fund

Carson Family Charitable Trust

Citi 

The Clark Charitable Foundation, Inc.

CME Group

The Coleman Foundation

Mrs. Kathryn W. Davis Diana Davis Spencer Foundation

Mr. Joseph DiMenna E*TRADE Financial

The Entrepreneurs of Tomorrow Fund

Ernst & Young

F. M. Kirby Foundation

Mr. Philip A. Falcone

Freddie Mac Foundation

GE/General Electric

GlobalHue

The Goldhirsh Foundation

Goldman Sachs & Co.

Google

Mr. Kenneth C. Griffin

Grosvenor Capital Management, L.P.

Henry E. Niles Foundation, Inc.

Mr. Landon Hilliard, III

Internet Capital Group Operations, Inc.

J. Willard & Alice S. Marriott Foundation

The JM Foundation

John S. and James L. Foundation

JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Ladera Foundation

Ms. Kimberly F. LaManna

The Lyle Foundation

Magnetar Capital LLC

Mr. Lowell B. Mason, Jr.

MasterCard Worldwide

Mr. Stephen McDonnell

Ms. Megan J. McGowan-Epstein

The MCJ Amelior Foundation

Multinational Scholar Charitable Trust 1907

MWW Group

New York Life Foundation

NYSE

Oppenheimer Funds Foundation

Peacock Foundation, Inc.

PIMCO Foundation

Pitney Bowes Inc. 

PNC Bank

Polk Bros. Foundation

Ms. Karen Pritzker / The Seedlings Foundation

Safeguard Scientifics, Inc. 

The Samberg Family Foundation

SAP America, Inc.

Anthony Scaramucci

Skybridge Capital

Soro Holdings

Starr International Foundation

State Street Foundation

Mr. Nariman Teymourian

VISA, Inc.

Wachovia-Wells Fargo 

William H. Donner Foundation

William Zimmerman Foundation

Windsong Trust

Mr. Tucker York