MENTOR:National Mentoring Partnership

At a Glance

National Office: 
201 South Street Suite 615
Boston, MA 02111
Phone: 617-303-4600

David Shapiro
People Served: 
4,500,000
Year Founded: 
1990
Tax ID: 
52-1674088

Focus area(s):

Mentoring

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Description

MENTOR: The National Mentoring Partnership (MENTOR) is the unifying champion for expanding quality mentoring relationships for young people in the United States. For more than 25 years, MENTOR has served the mentoring field by providing a public voice; developing and delivering resources to mentoring programs nationwide; and driving quality and impact in mentoring through evidence-based standards, innovative research and essential tools. MENTOR has developed and supports a national network of affiliate Mentoring Partnerships that provide regional, state and local leadership and infrastructure necessary to support the expansion of quality mentoring relationships. Together, MENTOR and its Mentoring Partnerships collaborate with the private, public and nonprofit sectors to ensure that all youth have the support they need through mentoring relationships to succeed at home, school and, ultimately, work. 

Impact and Outcomes

More than 4.5 million youth are engaged in high quality mentoring relationships across the country.
All 50 states have access to resources through either the network of affiliate Mentoring Partnerships or the resources and tools MENTOR provides.
One of the most durable and commonly cited reports on the impact of mentoring shows that compared to youth who are not in mentoring relationships, youth who benefit from the influence of a mentor are: 46% less likely to begin using drugs, 27% less likely to begin using alcohol, 52% less likely than their peers to skip school and 55% more likely to enroll in college (Source: Dr. Steve Aos and colleagues at WSIPP).
Advocacy for mentoring is a key component of the national conversation about improving life outcomes for youth.

Mission & Goals

MENTOR’s mission is to fuel the quality and quantity of mentoring relationships for America’s young people and to close the mentoring gap for the one in three young people growing up without the critical support that is needed to develop into thriving, productive and engaged adults.

Program

MENTOR works to close the mentoring gap and ensure that all young people have access to safe and effective mentoring relationships that help them achieve success at home, school and, ultimately, work. To do this, MENTOR has developed and supports a national network of affiliate Mentoring Partnerships to provide regional, state and local leadership and infrastructure necessary to support the expansion of quality mentoring relationships.

Building Cross-Sector Support

MENTOR increases private sector financial investments and volunteer commitments through initiatives like the Corporate Mentoring Challenge launched by First Lady Michelle Obama. MENTOR leads National Mentoring Month, and the In Real Life campaign, a multi-media public awareness campaign. Leveraging grassroots and corporate support, collaborations with national youth-serving organizations and innovative research, MENTOR advocates for public investments in quality mentoring programs and policies to ensure safety and effectiveness.

Strengthening the Mentoring Field

MENTOR and its affiliate network of Mentoring Partnerships reach thousands of direct service programs throughout our country, 80 percent of which do not have national headquarters to turn to for guidance and leadership, to provide resources, training and technical assistance, on-the-ground consulting, state and regional conferences and the annual National Mentoring Summit. In 2013, the Department of Justice Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) selected MENTOR to establish a national training and technical assistance center focused solely on mentoring called the National Mentoring Resource Center (NMRC). In 2015, 13,118 users visited the NMRC website – 66% being new visitors. In December of that year, MENTOR developed a blog feature to enhance the NMRC website and provide an additional tool for the mentoring field to access resources and to learn from each other, the NMRC Technical Assistance Providers and the Research Board. To help programs more effectively connect volunteers to youth, MENTOR also maintains the only national online zip code searchable database of mentoring programs called The Mentoring Connector. Additionally, MENTOR works with its affiliate network of Mentoring Partnerships to unify and expand upon local field census efforts by administering a national survey of mentoring programs across the country to produce a National State of Mentoring Report.

Setting the Bar for Quality

As the mentoring field has expanded over the last two decades, a growing body of research is advancing safe and effective practices, which MENTOR codified in the Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™ (EEP). To further advance youth mentoring research and increase practitioners’ skills and knowledge in applied evidence-based practices, MENTOR formed the Center for Evidence-Based Mentoring in partnership with the University of Massachusetts Boston. Additionally, MENTOR and its network of affiliate Mentoring Partnerships facilitate a National Quality Mentoring System (NQMS) to provide a structured, systematic process for evaluating a mentoring program’s implementation of the Elements of Effective Practice for Mentoring™. Mentoring Partnerships facilitating NQMS assist programs in identifying existing quality practices, areas for improvement and action plans to meet national standards while providing ongoing training and support to achieve those goals.

 

Impact

High quality mentoring has a very real and measurable impact on our society and economy. Mentoring programs are making meaningful, transformative change for young people’s ability to access education, live safe and healthy lives and contribute to the global economy through meaningful careers. Young adults who were at-risk for falling off track but had a mentor are:

•             55% more likely to enroll in college

•             52% less likely than their peers to skip a day of school

•             37% less likely to skip a class

•             130% more likely to hold leadership positions

•             81% more likely to participate in extracurricular activities

•             78% more likely to volunteer regularly in their communities

•             46% less likely than their peers to use illegal drugs

•             27% less likely to start drinking

The mentoring effect can be a powerful factor in reducing the number of youth disconnected from school and work and increasing social and economic mobility, contributing to a more productive and prosperous nation for all people. When MENTOR was founded in 1990, there were an estimated 300,000 at-risk young people in structured mentoring relationships. Today, research shows that 4.5 million at-risk young people will have a structured mentoring relationship growing up. Additionally, there are thousands of youth development programs in the United States serving millions of young people across a variety of social constructs, including education, workforce development and juvenile justice. Integrating evidence-based mentoring practices into these programs can help youth perceived to be most at risk thrive and strive at various stages of development and ultimately into adulthood. Studies of formal mentoring programs provide strong evidence of their success in reducing the incidence of delinquency, substance use and academic failure, and indicate positive outcomes such as improved self-esteem, social skills and knowledge of career opportunities. Overall, research confirms what we know anecdotally, that mentoring works. And while we have made tremendous progress over the past 25 years, there is still much work to be done to close the mentoring gap in our country and ensure that the one in three young people growing up without the critical support of a mentor have access to one.

From a financial perspective, an investment in mentoring triples the impact in a community.  For example, every $1.00 invested in mentoring assumes $3.28 in benefits by reducing costs associated with crime, substance abuse, teen pregnancy and low educational outcomes. (Source: Dr. Steve Aos and colleagues at WSIPP).

 

Growth Plan

Today, as the catalyst and leader for quality mentoring, MENTOR and its network of 26 affiliate Mentoring Partnerships provide cross-sector influence strategy and are steadily making progress towards closing the gap. By providing training and technical assistance to direct service mentoring programs, MENTOR and its affiliates are helping to ensure mentoring relationships are safe and effective and mentoring programs are prepared to scale their efforts and support more young people through mentoring relationships.

Building on a new operating model, MENTOR is also working on developing a strategic network growth plan with the hopes of scaling the affiliate network of Mentoring Partnerships to achieve 50-state coverage. Together, MENTOR, its network of affiliate Mentoring Partnerships, and leading national mentoring organizations are collaborating to advance the availability and impact of mentoring as a proven youth development strategy resulting in positive outcomes for young people and communities in a variety of contexts.

Location of Sites

National Office: 
201 South Street Suite 615
Boston, MA 02111
Phone: 617-303-4600
List of locations

To make a contribution to a program site:

  1. Click on the "Make a Contribution Now" button and include the name, city and state of the program you would like to support, in the "notes" text box on the organization's donation form, if available.
  2. If a "notes" or "designation" box is not available, write the city and state on your check in the "notes" section or call the national office to designate your contribution to a local program site.

Locations in the following states:

No results found.

Financials

Most Recent Budget

Year Ended:

2016

REVENUE

Corporate Grants: 
$1,010,000
Foundation Grants: 
$1,031,000
Government Funding: 
$1,756,000
Contributions from Individuals: 
$1,899,500
Special Events: 
$1,888,425
Program Services Fees: 
$893,408
Membership Dues: 
$0
Other Earned Income: 
$0
Other Revenue: 
$52,000
Other Revenue (Description): 
In-kind
Total Revenue: 
$8,530,333

EXPENSES

Salaries, Related Salaries & Professional Fees: 
$4,336,396
Occupancy: 
$257,244
Travel & Entertainment: 
$228,306
Office Supplies, Printing, Postage: 
$172,384
Telephone & Communications: 
$32,029
Payments to Affiliates: 
$1,057,000
Other Expenses: 
$660,935
Other Expenses (Description): 

Primarily includes National Mentoring Summit conference expenses but also includes a grant to the Center for Evidence Based Mentoring at UMass-Boston and some misc. administrative expenses

Other Expenses (Description): 

Total Expenses: 
$6,744,294

NET GAIN/LOSS

Net Gain/Loss: 
$1,786,039

Prior Year Actuals

Year Ended:

2015

REVENUE

Corporate Grants: 
$519,500
Foundation Grants: 
$850,750
Government Funding: 
$747,059
Contributions from Individuals: 
$1,504,758
Program Services Fees: 
$704,508
Membership Dues: 
$0
Other Earned Income: 
$0
Other Revenue: 
$26,841
Other Revenue (Description): 
In-kind
Special Events: 
$1,410,406
Total Revenue: 
$5,763,822

EXPENSES

Salaries, Related Salaries & Professional Fees: 
$3,056,333
Occupancy: 
$247,884
Travel & Entertainment: 
$133,498
Office Supplies, Printing, Postage: 
$159,363
Telephone & Communication: 
$34,111
Payments to Affiliates: 
$631,235
Other Expenses: 
$580,580
Other Expenses (Description): 

Primarily includes National Mentoring Summit conference expenses but also includes a grant to the center for Evidence Based Mentoring at UMass Boston and some misc. administrative expenses

Total Expenses: 
$4,843,004

NET GAIN/LOSS

Net Gain / Loss: 
$920,818

Major Funders

Altria

AT&T

Bank of America

Blenheim Capital Management

Carnegie Corporation of New York

JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Highland Street Foundation

MCJ Amelior Foundation

The Monteforte Foundation

Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention

Roundtable Investment Partners