Latin American Youth Center

At a Glance

National Office: 
1419 Columbia Road, NW
Washington , DC 20009
Phone: 202.319.2225

Lori M. Kaplan
People Served: 
4,245
Year Founded: 
1968
Tax ID: 
52-1023074

Focus area(s):

Personal & Leadership Development
Mentoring
After-School & Out-of-School

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Description

The Latin American Youth Center (LAYC) is a nationally recognized multi-cultural, multi-service agency serving all low-income youth across the District of Columbia and in Maryland’s Prince George’s and Montgomery counties.  LAYC’s mission is “to support youth and their families to live, work, and study with dignity, hope, and joy.”  To achieve its mission, LAYC provides services and opportunities to over 4,000 individuals annually to support academic achievement, promote healthy behaviors, and guide youth toward successful adulthood.   

Impact and Outcomes

In 2011, LAYC’s Workforce Readiness division served 476 youth and young adults. Of those served, 134 youth completed job readiness training, and 238 youth were placed in jobs.
The Promotor Pathway, an intensive relationship-based strategy to meet the multiple needs of the most vulnerable youth, served 141 young people. Of those youth, 13 youth re-enrolled in school, three graduated from high school, 33 were placed in jobs, and 15 improved their housing status.
LAYC assisted 20 individuals self-identified as Hispanic/Latino in receiving their GED in 2008, which equates to nearly 21% of all Hispanic/Latinos obtaining their GED in DC in 2008.

Mission & Goals

LAYC, one of the nation’s leading youth development agencies, is a multi-cultural community-based organization whose mission is to support youth and their families to live, work, and study with dignity, hope, and joy.  The organization now serves all low-income youth and families across the District of Columbia and in Maryland’s Prince George’s and Montgomery Counties. 

LAYC has a shared commitment to meet young people where they are and help them make a successful transition to young adulthood.  LAYC provides multi-lingual, culturally sensitive programs in eight areas: Educational Enhancement, Workforce Investment, Social Services, Residential Placement, Art and Media, Recreation, Community Wellness, and Advocacy.

LAYC's youth development model has three goals for each of their young people:

  • Increased academic success 
  • Improved ability to successfully transition to work 
  • Improved skills for healthy living

Program

LAYC’s Promotor/Navigator Pathway is an intensive client-centered long-term model that provides comprehensive wrap-around supports and mentoring for youth who face the greatest life challenges. These youth, many of whom are out-of-school and between the ages of 16-24, are often referred to as “disconnected” and may be homeless or living in unsafe environments, abusing substances, experiencing mental health issues, questioning their sexuality, involved with the criminal justice system, no longer in or about to drop out of school, unemployed, or dealing with family members involved with criminal or gang activity.  The Promotor/Navigator Pathway aggressively seeks to transform these circumstances and thus transform the lives of these young people.

Many youth are “disconnected” because the support systems in their lives have failed.  These young people have fallen through the cracks of society’s safety nets.   Disconnected youth do not have the supports in their lives to manage the complexities of day-to-day issues, much less move towards their future goals. Promotores/Navigators become the support systems to address this situation. 

LAYC’s model Pathway utilizes Promotores/Navigators to reconnect young people to the services, supports, and opportunities they need to meet their educational, workforce, and social goals.  Promotores/Navigators are not direct service providers or traditional case managers. Rather, Promotores/Navigators actively encourage youth to participate in a broad set of LAYC programs, connect youth to referral services as necessary, and remain with each young person over the long term, estimated from four to six years. Their goal is to help disconnected youth make a successful transition to adulthood and reconnect to their families, schools, and communities. 

Impact

Between the September 2008 launch and May 31, 2011, 176 youth have participated in the Promotor Pathway.  To measure the effectiveness of the Promotor Pathway, LAYC sought the service of an organization to act as an external evaluator.  LAYC selected Public/Private Ventures (P/PV) as the external evaluators of the Promotor Pathway.  P/PV’s 40-month long evaluation will use a multi-method design consisting of an implementation study and an impact study.  One hundred and sixteen youth were enrolled prior to the start of the randomization process associated with the external evaluation being conducted by P/PV, and 60 youth were enrolled post-randomization.  

Promotores work with youth who are homeless or in foster care, have substance abuse or mental health issues, are involved with the criminal justice system or gangs, have dropped out of school, and are unemployed. 

Since February 2010, the Promotor Pathway has retained approximately 94% of youth participants, having lost only six to lack of interest or refusal of services.  This considerable improvement in retention can be attributed to a few factors: (1) with the implementation of the external evaluation in April 2010, potential participants must now complete a more rigorous referral process, including additional evaluation paperwork; and (2) increased effort to adjust early engagement of the Promotor with the young person to focus on mentoring and initial relationship-building has had a positive impact.  An analysis of dismissed youth revealed that most struggled to engage with their Promotor in the first three months of acceptance into the Pathway. 

Growth Plan

LAYC has clearly defined outcomes and indicators for the Promotor Pathway.  As this is a new model in the youth development field, internal and external evaluations now underway will guide us in development of objectives for individual youth. 

In addition to objectives for individual youth, LAYC has two overall objectives for the Pathway model that, of course, will be refined once we have obtained evaluation results: (1) national and even international replication; and (2) Promotor certification.  On the former, LAYC has already been approached by nonprofits in locations as different as Baltimore, MD, and Kentucky with requests for information on how to implement the model. Assuming evaluation results prove the model effective, LAYC will work with government and foundation funders to develop a cost-efficient manner to replicate the model in any setting, including staff training, implementation of risk assessments, evaluation design, etc. On the latter, again in response to demand from the field, we have begun to explore Promotor certification through CEU credits.

Promotor Pathway scale up, shown in the chart below, is dependent on a range of factors, including evaluation findings. 

 

Fiscal Year*

(FY)

Number of youth to be served

by end of fiscal year

Number of

Promotores

FY11

200

11

FY12

240

13

FY13

280

15

FY14

 

320

15

FY15

360

17

Location of Sites

National Office: 
1419 Columbia Road, NW
Washington , DC 20009
Phone: 202.319.2225
List of locationsMap of locations

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Locations in the following states:

District Of Columbia

Maryland

Financials

Most Recent Budget

Year Ended:

2013

REVENUE

Corporate Grants: 
$0
Foundation Grants: 
$3,126,250
Government Funding: 
$7,940,110
Contributions from Individuals: 
$0
Special Events: 
$0
Program Services Fees: 
$0
Membership Dues: 
$0
Other Earned Income: 
$325,000
Other Revenue: 
$726,000
Other Revenue (Description): 
Other Revenue includes all grants and contracts.
Total Revenue: 
$12,117,360

EXPENSES

Salaries, Related Salaries & Professional Fees: 
$8,374,292
Occupancy: 
$34,000
Travel & Entertainment: 
$105,000
Office Supplies, Printing, Postage: 
$134,457
Telephone & Communications: 
$89,450
Payments to Affiliates: 
$0
Other Expenses: 
$3,380,161
Other Expenses (Description): 

Other expenses include: client costs, rental & maintenance, insurance, depreciation, interest and bank charges, and other.

Total Expenses: 
$12,117,360

NET GAIN/LOSS

Net Gain/Loss: 
$0

Prior Year Actuals

Year Ended:

2012

REVENUE

Corporate Grants: 
$0
Foundation Grants: 
$4,418,443
Government Funding: 
$6,238,235
Contributions from Individuals: 
$0
Program Services Fees: 
$0
Membership Dues: 
$0
Other Earned Income: 
$33,405
Other Revenue: 
$1,202,426
Other Revenue (Description): 
Other revenue includes: rental income and other.
Special Events: 
$352,448
Total Revenue: 
$12,244,957

EXPENSES

Salaries, Related Salaries & Professional Fees: 
$6,938,902
Occupancy: 
$501,613
Travel & Entertainment: 
$79,214
Office Supplies, Printing, Postage: 
$258,292
Telephone & Communication: 
$179,662
Payments to Affiliates: 
$0
Other Expenses: 
$3,296,649
Other Expenses (Description): 

Other expenses include: training, rental & maintenance, insurance, depreciation, provision for uncollectible receivables, and other.

Total Expenses: 
$11,254,332

NET GAIN/LOSS

Net Gain / Loss: 
$990,625

Major Funders

 

Corporation for National and Community Service (DC &MD)

$394,848

DC APRA (two programs)

$285,000

DC Child and Family Services Agency (three programs)

$1,750,000

DC Department of Employment Services (two programs)

$500,000

DC Department of Human Services (two programs)

$330,127

DC Department of Mental Health

$109,000

DC Department of Youth Rehabilitation Services

$300,000

DC Justice Grants Administration

$300,000

DC Office of the State Superintendent of Education

$175,658

Edna McConnell Clark Foundation

$1,000,000

Fannie Mae

$150,000

Freddie Mac 

$100,000

Jenesis Group

$500,000

Kellogg Foundation

$300,000

Kogod Family Foundation

$200,000

MD Governor's Office on Service/Voluntarism

$128,504

Montgomery County Department of Economic Development

$725,000

Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation

$350,000

PG County Office of Economic Development

$315,538

Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors

$75,000

US Department of Education Supplemental Education Services

$200,000

US Department of Education/21st Century Demonstration Project

$331,269

US Department of Education/Upward Bound

$543,000

US Department of Health and Human Services/Basic Center

$100,000

US Department of Health and Human Services/Viol Prevention, MD

$324,500

US Department of Health and Human Services/Responsible Fatherhood

$250,000

US Department of Justice

$750,000