"I Have A Dream" Foundation

At a Glance

National Office: 
330 Seventh Avenue 20th floor
New York, NY 10001
Phone: 212-293-5480

Donna Lawrence
People Served: 
13,000
Year Founded: 
1981
Tax ID: 
13-3355315

Focus area(s):

College Access

See These Reports For More Information

Description

The "I Have A Dream" Foundation (IHDF) works to expand educational opportunity, with a focus on empowering students in low-income communities to achieve higher education.  IHDF provides its ‘Dreamers’ with guaranteed tuition support and equips them with the skills, knowledge, and opportunities they need to gain entry to higher education and succeed in college and beyond.  Today, more than 3,000 Dreamers are working their way to college in 17 states, Washington, D.C., and New Zealand, following the 11,000 alumni who came before them.

Building off of its 30-year history, "I Have A Dream" Foundation is embarking upon an ambitious effort to scale its efforts and reach dramatically more students. As part of this new extension model, IHDF is partnering with schools to provide their students with key supports that are strongly tied to college success and that schools aren’t well equipped to deliver on their own. Through this collective impact model, IHDF will ensure that many more low-income students not just reach but complete college.

Mission & Goals

Need

The “I Have A Dream” Foundation (IHDF) is working to change a critical reality: in our nation today, only 10% of students in low-income communities are expected to earn a college degree. 

Vision

That one day, all children in this nation will have the opportunity to achieve higher education and fully capitalize on their talents, aspirations, and leadership to have fulfilling careers and create a better world.

Mission

IHDF empowers children in low-income communities to achieve higher education and fulfill their leadership potential by providing them with guaranteed tuition support and equipping them with the skills, knowledge, and opportunities they need to gain entry to higher education and succeed in college and beyond.  By helping Dreamers gain access to college, IHDF sets these students on a different academic and life trajectory, while having a broader impact on the generations that follow.

Program

High expectations drive IHDF's program, with college graduation as the assumed outcome for each Dreamer.  As Dreamers progress through the program, they transition from being served to serving, and from being led to leading.

Core program. IHDF sponsors entire cohorts of students at public schools and public housing complexes in low-income communities, and provides these 'Dreamers' with intensive, long-term wrap-around services that start no later than 3rd grade and continue through the first year of college. Upon high school graduation, each ‘Dreamer’ receives guaranteed tuition support for higher education.

Programmatic components, consistent across sites, are delivered after school, on weekends, and over the summer. They include:

•Rigorous academic programming and tutoring;
•College preparation, visits, and admissions support;
•Community service and civic engagement;
•Career awareness and job training;
•Social and cultural enrichment;
•Life skills education;
•Parental involvement; and
•Mentoring.

Tuition support for each Dreamer is provided on a last-dollar basis and capped at the in-state tuition rate. In addition to removing financial barriers, the promise of tuition promotes a culture of college and makes college attainment tangible for Dreamers and all those who work with them.

Extension Model. Working with some of the nation's top school leaders, IHDF recently launched a new initiative to scale its impact and equip many more low-income students to get ‘to and through’ college.   As part of this initiative, IHDF partners with schools to provide their students with high-impact supports that are strongly tied to college success and that schools aren’t well equipped to deliver on their own.

 The extension model includes the following central program components, some proprietary and some sourced through partners:

•College Knowledge - A personalized college roadmap along with companion tools and resources to guide students in preparing for and succeeding in college;
•College Savings Accounts - College savings accounts for each student, coupled with financial literacy programming and support accessing other sources of financial aid;
•College Partners - A network of colleges and universities to support students in preparing for higher education and gaining admission to and successfully completing college; and
•Network of Champions - A network of champions to help students achieve their goals and access opportunities otherwise not available to them.

The offerings, which draw on the 30-year experience of "I Have A Dream", will be delivered through a scalable services model and technology platform, which will serve as each student’s main college gateway and allow IHDF and partner schools to track Dreamer and alumni progress.

Impact

Direct Impact

Achievement Outcomes

A 2001 external analysis of 8 local IHDF evaluations showed that IHDF has had a dramatic impact on Dreamer high school completion and college enrollment rates, in many cases averaging 10-15 percentage points higher than their peers'.

More recent external studies have shown similar education gains:
•A 2010 study showed that nearly 85% of New York City (NYC) Dreamers completed secondary education (68% high school graduates and 16% obtaining GEDs), compared with 55% for NYC public school students overall. 
•The same 2010 study showed that NYC Dreamers have enrolled in post-secondary education programs at a rate of 85%, exceeding the New York City average (64%), with 33% of alumni attending four-year institutions.
•A 2008 study of two IHDF Chicago programs reported a 34 percentage point increase in on-time high school graduation and a 35 percentage point increase in college enrollment when compared with comparable students in the district.
•A 2008 study of two East Palo Alto programs found that Dreamers graduated from high school ahead of peers in their school district by 20-41 percentage points.

Leadership and Non-Academic Skills and Mindsets

Numerous studies have demonstrated that IHDF has had a significant impact on Dreamers' leadership, engagement, and non-academic skills and mindsets, and also positively engages parents. For example:

A recent annual survey of IHDF Boulder County Dreamers showed that 100% of Dreamers believed they would graduate from high school and 98% wanted to go to college.
•97% of parents of IHDF Boulder County Dreamers reported that they expected their children to pursue post-secondary education.
•98% of IHDF Boulder County Dreamers reported that they participated in at least one extra-curricular activity, 86% were volunteering in their community, and 94% felt better about themselves because they helped others.
•In a 2009 study, teachers of Los Angeles Dreamers report that 90%+ of Dreamer behavior is satisfactory or excellent.
•90% of Los Angeles Dreamers believe that they have a responsibility to make the world a better place.
•85% of IHDF New York Metro Dreamer Alumni reported that IHDF had a 'very positive' or 'positive' influence on their decision to attend college.

Systemic Impact 

Beyond Dreamer academic, attitudinal, and leadership gains, IHDF has helped promote broader systemic change for all students.

IHDF’s program model has been widely replicated across the country, in organizations such as GEAR UP (Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs) and Say Yes to Education.

In addition, many IHDF sponsors and volunteers have become lifelong advocates and champions of our students as a result of their work with Dreamers. They have leveraged insights gained by working closely with Dreamers over a long period of time, to launch some of the nation’s most promising education reform organizations today.

Growth Plan

For the next few years, IHDF's primary focus is to refine and expand the extension model, while continuing to support the success and growth of existing affiliates.
 

Core Program

It costs $1.5 - $2M on average to support a cohort of 50-80 Dreamers over the lifetime of the program, including: (1) guaranteed tuition support for each Dreamer over 4-6 years of college; and (2) comprehensive, wraparound services that start in early elementary school and extend through the first year of college. Independent local affiliates manage and raise funds for each cohort, traditionally through individual Sponsors and increasingly through a diversified base of funders including individuals, foundations, corporations, government, and events. The funds raised are highly leveraged, with local affiliates relying heavily on an extensive network of volunteers and pro bono partners.

More than 200 cohorts have been launched to date, with 8-10 new cohorts planned for the next three years to serve an additional 600+ students by FY15. In addition, several affiliates plan to pilot a school-based model to serve multiple grades at the same school.

The national office guides and provides resources to local affiliates. The national budget for supporting our core program has stayed relatively steady at approximately $1.2 - $1.6M/year, but is seeking an additional $1M in investments over the next there years to increase its support of affiliates and offer greater services, particularly around performance management sharing of best practices, alumni support (with 11,000 alumni nationwide to date), and growth of local programs.

Extension Program

IHDF has launched its new extension model to leverage the organization's existing competencies to reach many more students.  The model, which involves partnering with public schools, requires upfront investments but has been designed to be highly scalable. Program components will be delivered partly through a technology platform and can be widely deployed, at minimal additional costs, to a much greater number of schools and communities as each program component is tested and refined.

IHDF will provide high touch services to a portfolio of Tier I schools, including raising funds for their scholars' CSA accounts and providing consulting services. This close partnership will enable IHDF to continuously test, refine, and improve the extension model. IHDF will also serve a much larger number of Tier II schools, which will have access to most program offerings, but will receive no CSA funding and minimal consulting services.

IHDF plans to achieve sustainability through a mix of revenues, including (1) school partner fees to cover operating costs; (2) individual donors and mass fundraising campaigns to cover CSA investments for Tier I schools; and (3) foundation and corporate support to cover one-time investments and growth capital.

To further test, refine, and expand its new extension model, IHDF requires $7M in investment capital over the next three years, with $500K raised to date. These funds will enable IHDF to build out the team, finish developing its new service offerings, create the technology platform, finance a start-up CSA fund, and expand the extension model to additional students and partner schools.  IHDF launched the extension model with three Tier I schools in New York City in FY13, serving 300 ninth graders. It plans to scale up across these schools and expand to 12 new schools by FY15, for a total of 5 Tier I schools and 10 Tier II schools. By FY15, IHDF will serve 6,000 students, with 1,000 receiving CSA investments provided by IHDF. Subsequently, IHDF plans to expand to new regions outside of New York City.

Location of Sites

National Office: 
330 Seventh Avenue 20th floor
New York, NY 10001
Phone: 212-293-5480
List of locations

To make a contribution to a program site:

  1. Click on the "Make a Contribution Now" button and include the name, city and state of the program you would like to support, in the "notes" text box on the organization's donation form, if available.
  2. If a "notes" or "designation" box is not available, write the city and state on your check in the "notes" section or call the national office to designate your contribution to a local program site.

Locations in the following states:

Auckland

California

Colorado

Florida

Georgia

Iowa

Illinois

North Carolina

New Jersey

Nevada

New York

Oregon

South Carolina

Texas

Virginia

Wisconsin

Financials

Most Recent Budget

Year Ended:

2013

REVENUE

Corporate Grants: 
$0
Foundation Grants: 
$100,000
Government Funding: 
$0
Contributions from Individuals: 
$1,344,000
Special Events: 
$580,000
Program Services Fees: 
$123,750
Membership Dues: 
$0
Other Earned Income: 
$0
Other Revenue: 
$0
Total Revenue: 
$2,147,750

EXPENSES

Salaries, Related Salaries & Professional Fees: 
$1,574,450
Occupancy: 
$103,454
Travel & Entertainment: 
$32,500
Office Supplies, Printing, Postage: 
$38,469
Telephone & Communications: 
$54,156
Payments to Affiliates: 
$0
Other Expenses: 
$320,224
Other Expenses (Description): 

Special events costs, program expenses, insurance, and other misc. costs.

Total Expenses: 
$2,123,253

NET GAIN/LOSS

Net Gain/Loss: 
$24,497

Prior Year Actuals

Year Ended:

2012

REVENUE

Corporate Grants: 
$53,785
Foundation Grants: 
$56,900
Government Funding: 
$0
Contributions from Individuals: 
$1,177,195
Program Services Fees: 
$79,500
Membership Dues: 
$0
Other Earned Income: 
$0
Other Revenue: 
$1,295
Special Events: 
$380,647
Total Revenue: 
$1,749,322

EXPENSES

Salaries, Related Salaries & Professional Fees: 
$1,001,337
Occupancy: 
$104,923
Travel & Entertainment: 
$30,620
Office Supplies, Printing, Postage: 
$28,274
Telephone & Communication: 
$32,649
Payments to Affiliates: 
$0
Other Expenses: 
$214,255
Other Expenses (Description): 

Special events costs, program expenses, insurance, and other misc. costs.

Total Expenses: 
$1,412,058

NET GAIN/LOSS

Net Gain / Loss: 
$337,264

Major Funders

Foundations

Charles Hayden Foundation
H.N. and Frances C. Berger Foundation
Maizlish Family Foundation
Tiger Baron Foundation
 
Corporations
Catapult Learning, LLC
Clifford Chance US, LLP
Excel Security
Legg Mason
Newmark Grubb Knight Frank
Paramount Group, Inc
Paul Hastings, LLP
Principal Building Services
Sullivan & Cromwell, LLP
Tishman Speyer Properties, LP
Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz LLP
Wells Fargo & Company
 
Individuals
Joseph Azrack
Martin Budd
Anthony Carter
Milton Cooper
Srinivas Dhulipala
Mitzi and Warren Eisenberg
Mark Fornasiero
Lincoln Frank
Dany Garcia
Matthew Goldstein
Mark Gordon
Jeffrey Gural
John Kean
Thomas Kean
Eugene M. Lang
Frank Liddell
Carol McGuire
Shmuel Meitar
Craig Powell
Bette and Richard Saltzman
Ludwika Schein
J. Ronald Terwilliger
Stephanie Trump
Stuart Udell