Higher Achievement

At a Glance

National Office: 
1750 Columbia Road, NW
Washington, DC 20009
Phone: (202) 861-7753
People Served: 
1,201
Year Founded: 
1975
Tax ID: 
52-1383374

Focus area(s):

After-School & Out-of-School
Mentoring
Reading/Math

See These Reports For More Information

Description

Higher Achievement recognizes that the persistent achievement gap in this country is fueled by a lack of opportunity. Therefore, Higher Achievement provides students with opportunity at the right time – middle school. Their approach is distinguished by “Three Rs”: Rigor, Relationships, and Results. They provide low-income scholars with 650 hours of enrichment annually, challenging them with standards-aligned coursework (rigor); surround them with dedicated mentors, caring adults, and a nurturing culture (relationships) – the combination produces extraordinary gains in academics, social/emotional skills, and long-term success (results). Higher Achievement serves scholars in four cities: Baltimore, MD, Pittsburgh, PA, Richmond, VA, and Washington, DC. 

Impact and Outcomes

95% of Higher Achievement alumni graduate high school on time. That is 20% higher than the average graduation rates in the cities they serve.
Through a recent study, Higher Achievement found that their scholars make measurable academic gains in math and improvements in reading. Gains were equivalent to an extra 48 days of learning in math and an extra 30 days in reading when compared to an equally motivated control group.

Mission & Goals

Why Higher Achievement?

https://youtu.be/4a1UUVkNPD4

Higher Achievement closes the opportunity gap during the pivotal middle school years. By leveraging the power of communities, Higher Achievement’s proven model provides a rigorous year-round learning environment, caring role models, and a culture of high expectations, resulting in college-bound scholars with the character, confidence, and skills to succeed.

Through the support of the US Department of Education, the Norman and Ruth Rales Foundation, and the Wallace Foundation, Higher Achievement is deepening their impact in the cities they serve. In 2014, Higher Achievement served 1,000 scholars in 15 achievement centers. By 2019, Higher Achievement will serve over 1,900 scholars in 24 achievement centers.

Higher Achievement is working diligently toward their bold goal that by 2030, all students in Higher Achievement cities will graduate from high school, ready for college.

Program

Who are Higher Achievement Scholars?

https://youtu.be/-OXkWzMIdak

Higher Achievement is an expanded learning program focused on the transition to and through middle school. Their scholars are motivated and inspired 5th-8th grade students looking to bridge the opportunity gap in their communities. Scholars enter Higher Achievement with a range of academic performance levels and with varied levels of support inside and outside of their school. But all of their scholars leave their program with a strong belief in Higher Achievement’s four social justice pillars: voice, freedom, justice, and solidarity. Their organization commitment to these principles drives them to purposefully serve communities that lack opportunity. Their scholar population, with a demographic makeup of 80% African-American and 10% Latino, reflects the communities that they serve.

Scholars in Higher Achievement commit to 650 hours per year for 3 to 4 years – the equivalent of 100 extra school days each year.

Higher Achievement has three key programs that drive scholar success:

1.Through Afterschool Academy, scholars receive homework coaching, elective learning, dinner, and intensive small-group academic mentoring in math, literature, and seminars. This programs happens afterschool for 5 hours per day, 3 days per week from October-May.

2. Summer Academy is a six-week program that includes experiential learning field trips, electives, college visits, and –importantly- classes with curriculum aligned for the year ahead, not the year behind.

3. With the support of Higher Achievement’s follow-through and alumni programs, they support scholars as they transition to college preparatory high school programs, college, and beyond.

Impact

Higher Achievement is among only 2% of nonprofits in the country to have undergone a randomized-controlled trial study, and one of only 10% of those reporting statistically positive results. In 2013, MDRC found that Higher Achievement scholars make measurable academic gains in math and improvements in reading. Gains were equivalent to an extra 48 days of learning in math and an extra 30 days in reading when compared to an equally motivated control group. Higher Achievement also made a statistically significant impact on scholars accessing high-performing high schools as well as family engagement.

In 2015, Higher Achievement began a second RCT study in partnership with MDRC to learn whether they are making a measurable impact on the lives of their scholars.

Through ongoing data collection and analysis, Higher Achievement knows that in 2015:

.          67% of scholars improved or maintained A’s and B’s in reading, and 63% in math.

.          They served 1,201 scholars in 15 achievement centers.

.          An average of 86% of Higher Achievement graduates advanced to college preparatory high school programs.

Location of Sites

National Office: 
1750 Columbia Road, NW
Washington, DC 20009
Phone: (202) 861-7753
List of locations

To make a contribution to a program site:

  1. Click on the "Make a Contribution Now" button and include the name, city and state of the program you would like to support, in the "notes" text box on the organization's donation form, if available.
  2. If a "notes" or "designation" box is not available, write the city and state on your check in the "notes" section or call the national office to designate your contribution to a local program site.

Locations in the following states:

No results found.

Financials

Most Recent Budget

Year Ended:

2016

REVENUE

Corporate Grants: 
$1,917,219
Foundation Grants: 
$3,841,693
Government Funding: 
$3,302,044
Contributions from Individuals: 
$682,143
Special Events: 
$520,694
Program Services Fees: 
$0
Membership Dues: 
$0
Other Earned Income: 
$0
Other Revenue: 
$30,000
Other Revenue (Description): 
Probono legal fees
Total Revenue: 
$10,293,793

EXPENSES

Salaries, Related Salaries & Professional Fees: 
$7,512,576
Occupancy: 
$168,106
Travel & Entertainment: 
$248,975
Office Supplies, Printing, Postage: 
$125,871
Telephone & Communications: 
$57,690
Payments to Affiliates: 
$0
Other Expenses: 
$1,566,598
Other Expenses (Description): 
Other Expense (Description)
Scholar Expenses - $707,806S
Information Systems - $145,805
Insurance - $66,672
Special Events - $247,550
Professional Dev - $37,500
Advertising & Promo - $46,684
Meeting Expense - $45,370
Other Expenses (Description): 

Other Expenses (Description): 

Total Expenses: 
$9,679,816

NET GAIN/LOSS

Net Gain/Loss: 
$613,977

Prior Year Actuals

Year Ended:

2015

REVENUE

Corporate Grants: 
$1,504,015
Foundation Grants: 
$3,526,615
Government Funding: 
$3,340,306
Contributions from Individuals: 
$515,494
Program Services Fees: 
$0
Membership Dues: 
$0
Other Earned Income: 
$0
Other Revenue: 
$188,384
Other Revenue (Description): 
Probono leagal, Rental Income
Special Events: 
$0
Total Revenue: 
$9,074,814

EXPENSES

Salaries, Related Salaries & Professional Fees: 
$5,914,766
Occupancy: 
$177,435
Travel & Entertainment: 
$81,195
Office Supplies, Printing, Postage: 
$203,416
Telephone & Communication: 
$68,198
Payments to Affiliates: 
$48,645
Other Expenses: 
$1,385,997
Other Expenses (Description): 
Other Expense (Description)
Scholar Expenses - $428,493
Information Systems - $142,217
Insurance - $51,094
Special Events - $119,342
Professional Dev - $29,067
Advertising & Promo - $24,349
Meeting Expense - $133,038
Total Expenses: 
$7,879,652

NET GAIN/LOSS

Net Gain / Loss: 
$1,195,162

Major Funders

21st Century Community Learning Centers

Altria

Children and Youth Investment Trust Corporation

Family and Children Legacy Fund

Family League of Baltimore City

The Heinz Endowments

The J. Willard and Alice S. Marriott Foundation

Maryland State Department of Education

Richard King Mellon Foundation

NextUp RVA

Norman & Ruth Rales Foundation

Reed Smith, LLP

Toyota USA Foundation

U.S. Department of Education

The Wallace Foundation

Virginia Department of Education