CSH

At a Glance

National Office: 
61 Broadway, Suite 2300
New York, NY 10006
Phone: 2129862966

Deborah DeSantis
People Served: 
41,800
Year Founded: 
1991
Tax ID: 
133600232

Focus area(s):

Housing & Homelessness

See These Reports For More Information

Description

CSH is a national organization whose mission is to advance solutions that use housing as a platform for services to improve the lives of the most vulnerable people, maximize public resources and build healthy communities.  In each of the communities in which we work, CSH serves as both a catalyst, bringing together people, skills and resources, and as a thought leader, designing new programs and policies to meet the needs of vulnerable populations such as child welfare-involved families, the chronically homeless, Native Americans, veterans, and others.

Impact and Outcomes

Three and a half years after the start of the pilot of Keeping Families Together, evaluation results provide compelling evidence that SH is a cost-effective alternative to chronic neglect, child welfare system involvement, and foster care placements among vulnerable families:
90% of families stayed housed, and child welfare involvement has decreased, as indicated by a case closure rate of 61% and an 87% reduction of reported abuse and neglect cases.
100% of children returned from foster care, and school attendance increased.

Mission & Goals

CSH’s mission is to advance solutions that use housing as a platform for services to improve the lives of the most vulnerable people, maximize public resources and build healthy communities. CSH seeks to strengthen and preserve unstably housed families who have recurring contacts with child protective services by increasing national exposure and buy-in to the Keeping Families Together (KFT) model, which is a new but effective approach for engaging, housing, and serving high-need families with frequent interaction with the child welfare system. The ultimate goals of KFT are preventing foster care placement, promoting housing stability, and breaking the cycle of inter-generational poverty, homelessness, and systems involvement for parents and children.

Program

Keeping Families Together is a new but effective approach for engaging, housing, and serving high-need families, with the ultimate goal of preventing foster care placement and breaking the cycle of inter-generational poverty, homelessness, and child welfare involvement for parents and children. Keeping Families Together includes these core components: affordable housing for families; strong inter-agency collaboration to identify, engage, house and effectively serve families; and evidence-based practices for serving families and children, including trauma-informed services. CSH’s KFT initiative in New York City marked the first time non time -limited supportive housing was tested as a child welfare intervention. CSH pioneered the way for the homeless and child welfare systems to collaborate to best serve high-need families. The Theory of Change for Keeping Families Together is that the supportive housing model, normally applied in a single-person household context, will be effective in meeting the needs of those poor families most at risk of child-welfare agency involvement and dissolution.Keeping Families Together serves families who have persistent challenges that compromise their ability to provide a safe and stable home for their children. Poverty, mental illness, substance abuse issues, low educational attainment, and little work history are common.

Impact

Through the initiative, CSH engaged five New York City government agencies and six supportive housing providers to identify and house 29 chronically homeless families, deemed at-risk of separation and foster care placement. Families in the pilot received a number of supportive services, including the one-on-one assistance of a case manager to help them navigate and access services. In addition, families participated in evidence-based support group on wellness, self-management, and family support. Many Keeping Families Together providers offered employment assistance, clinical assistance, and substance abuse counseling onsite. The initiative also included a robust process and outcome evaluation. Three and a half years after the start of the initiative, Keeping Families Together’s evaluation results provide compelling evidence that supportive housing is a cost-effective alternative to chronic neglect, child welfare system involvement, and foster care placements among vulnerable families:

  • Families stayed housed. At the end of the evaluation period, 26 of the 29 Keeping Families Together families remained in supportive housing.
  • Children were reunified with their families.All six children who were in placement with a goal of reunification were returned to their families.
  • Child welfare system-involvement decreased.61% of the child welfare cases that were open prior to Keeping Families Together have closed.
  • Incidences of repeat maltreatment were reduced. During their time in supportive housing, the number of open abuse/neglect cases decreased from 46 to 13. 63.6% had no subsequent cases after moving to supportive housing.

These extraordinary outcomes, among the hardest to serve families, suggest that we have identified a way of preventing abuse and ending traumatic foster care placements for families characterized by extreme poverty, disabling conditions, and overall instability.

Growth Plan

CSH is pursuing a national initiative to expand and further test the impact of Keeping Families Together to advance systems change by integrating child welfare, housing, and health resources at the state and local levels. This national initiative would encompass the following components:

  • Replication of Keeping Families Together in 10 - 15 communities with capacity to implement the model and serve a cohort of between 250 and 750 families over 5 years
    • Intensive assistance to the demonstration sites, with on-the-ground,  CSH staff involvement and assistance in planning and implementation.
    • Lighter touch (and lower per site cost) assistance to an additional 5-10 sites that are not selected via the HHS/ACYF RFP.
  • Implementation technical assistance to replication communities around: a) targeting and recruitment of vulnerable families with repeated child welfare involvement, and b) provision of supportive housing
  • Collaboration building and resource alignment between state and local child welfare, housing, public assistance and health agencies and systems
  • A rigorous, multi-site evaluation and conducted by a credible university or research institute to measure program impact on child well-being, family stability and self-sufficiency, child welfare system involvement, and cost-effectiveness
  • Federal and philanthropic resources to support this effort and catalyze the integration of state and local systems and resources.

We estimate that CSH will need just over $2.13MM per year (over three years) in staffing and other direct costs to support a 15-site expansion effort. Personnel costs are the largest portion of the budget, estimated at $844,062 annually for 15 sites. The bulk of this cost is associated with the first five replication sites, that will receive intensive CSH assistance. This leaves $113,750 in annual costs for staffing the TA for the remaining 10 sites. This is a brand new initiative and many communities will require a great deal of one-on-one support. This kind of intense consultation requires a substantial investment over the next 3 years to ensure that implementation occurs swiftly and that replication sites are adhering to the values set forth in the Keeping Families Together pilot. Lastly, intense work needs to be done locally to ensure that infrastructure is being developed to support and sustain long term adoption of Keeping  Families Together.

In terms of other costs, the model includes direct operating costs (rent, telephone, insurance, duplication, and printing); all calculated using standard CSH rates applied directly to the personnel costs for the initiative. The model also includes $10,000 annually for the development of publications (a fixed cost for the entire initiative), travel, which grows proportionally as we add more sites, and $20,000 in meeting expenses for the entire initiative, with most meetings to be held with the first 5 sites. Finally, the budget includes costs for our partners and consultants, including $250,000 annually for our child welfare TA provider partner (a fixed cost); $500,000 annually for the third-party evaluation (plus a marginal amount of additional cost for less formal evaluation in the other  5-10 sites); training consultants for national webinars, $50,000 annually for the sites (plus a marginal amount of additional cost for less intensive training in the other 5-10 sites); and $25,000 annually for a data consultant to develop approaches for using data to identify child-welfare-involved and homeless families (a fixed cost).

Location of Sites

National Office: 
61 Broadway, Suite 2300
New York, NY 10006
Phone: 2129862966
List of locations

To make a contribution to a program site:

  1. Click on the "Make a Contribution Now" button and include the name, city and state of the program you would like to support, in the "notes" text box on the organization's donation form, if available.
  2. If a "notes" or "designation" box is not available, write the city and state on your check in the "notes" section or call the national office to designate your contribution to a local program site.

Locations in the following states:

California

Connecticut

Florida

Iowa

New York

Tennessee

Financials

Most Recent Budget

Year Ended:

2014

REVENUE

Corporate Grants: 
$13,500
Foundation Grants: 
$6,916,638
Government Funding: 
$1,945,041
Contributions from Individuals: 
$7,852
Special Events: 
$35,275
Program Services Fees: 
$252,882
Membership Dues: 
$0
Other Earned Income: 
$1,762,161
Other Revenue: 
$0
Total Revenue: 
$10,933,349

EXPENSES

Salaries, Related Salaries & Professional Fees: 
$4,560,601
Occupancy: 
$417,585
Travel & Entertainment: 
$293,179
Office Supplies, Printing, Postage: 
$35,713
Telephone & Communications: 
$55,014
Payments to Affiliates: 
$0
Other Expenses: 
$2,189,447
Other Expenses (Description): 

Other expenses include:

  • Management Information Systems: $83,528
  • Equipment repairs & maintenance: $27,655
  • Insurance: $27,390
  • Other administrative expenses: $92,659
  • Conferences, meetings & seminars: $234,484
  • Depreciation: $63,002
  • Grants to supportive housing providers: $991,763
  • Interest expense: $519,209
  • PIL reserve: $162,451
  • Bad debt expense (for CDFI lending operations): $774,263. Per our Board-approved credit policy, CSH must set-aside monies in a reserve fund for all loans made to our nonprofit, SH project borrowers. This reserve is equivalent to 10% of the loan amount for each loan CSH makes. Although we only lose this money in the event that a borrower defaults, we are required to include it as an expense in our operating budget and to keep these funds in reserve throughout the year in the event of a default. CSH typically experiences very little defaults or write-offs on our loans to the SH industry.
Other Expenses (Description): 

Total Expenses: 
$7,551,539

NET GAIN/LOSS

Net Gain/Loss: 
$3,381,810

Prior Year Actuals

Year Ended:

2013

REVENUE

Corporate Grants: 
$2,432,614
Foundation Grants: 
$5,964,510
Government Funding: 
$5,250,223
Contributions from Individuals: 
$76,032
Program Services Fees: 
$7,294,904
Membership Dues: 
$0
Other Earned Income: 
$2,016,829
Other Revenue: 
$1,655,174
Other Revenue (Description): 
In-kind contributions from Board members of pro-bono legal and other needed services.
Special Events: 
$0
Total Revenue: 
$24,690,286

EXPENSES

Salaries, Related Salaries & Professional Fees: 
$11,248,198
Occupancy: 
$1,264,287
Travel & Entertainment: 
$671,900
Office Supplies, Printing, Postage: 
$91,710
Telephone & Communication: 
$190,558
Payments to Affiliates: 
$0
Other Expenses: 
$10,977,310
Other Expenses (Description): 

Other expenses include: 

  • Management Information Systems: $137,783
  • Equipment repairs & maintenance: $34,212
  • Insurance: $43,105
  • Other administrative expenses: $173,464
  • Conferences, meetings & seminars: $515,923
  • Grants to supportive housing providers: $2,731,288
  • Interest expense: $96,432
  • In-kind interest & services: $1,878,636. This includes pro-bono legal services provided by Mayer Brown, the law firm, which reviews all of CSH's loan agreements with our borrowers and advises on our compliance with rules and regulations for our New Market Tax Credit Program.
  • Bad debt expense (for CDFI lending operations): $475,550. Per our Board-approved credit policy, CSH must set-aside monies in a reserve fund for all loans made to our nonprofit, SH project borrowers. This reserve is equivalent to 10% of the loan amount for each loan CSH makes. Although we only lose this money in the event that a borrower defaults, we are required to include it as an expense in our operating budget and to keep these funds in reserve throughout the year in the event of a default. CSH typically experiences very little defaults or write-offs on our loans to the SH industry.
Total Expenses: 
$24,443,963

NET GAIN/LOSS

Net Gain / Loss: 
$246,323

Major Funders

 

Annie E. Casey Foundation

Bank of America Charitable Foundation

Blandin Foundation

California Community Foundation

California Institute for Mental Health

County of San Bernardino Behavioral Health Department

Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services

Enterprise Community Partners

Fannie Mae

Grand Rapids Community Foundation

Hilton Foundation

Illinois Department of Mental Health

Indiana Housing and Community Development Authority

JP Morgan Chase Bank

Kresge Foundation

Melville Charitable Trust

Michigan State Housing Development Authority

Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction

Opportunity Finance Network

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

The Chicago Housing Authority

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development

U.S. Department of Treasury

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

UniHealth Foundation