College Bound

At a Glance

National Office: 
110 N. Jefferson
St. Louis, MO 63103
Phone: 314-361-4441

Lisa Orden Zarin
People Served: 
599
Year Founded: 
2006
Tax ID: 
20-4768985

Focus area(s):

College Access
After-School & Out-of-School
Reading/Math

Description

College Bound provides promising students from low-income backgrounds with the academic enrichment, social supports and life skills needed to achieve high-quality postsecondary degrees to prepare them for careers yielding family-sustaining incomes. Our vision is to end the intergenerational cycle of poverty in our students' lives through college completion and workforce readiness.

Impact and Outcomes

99.6 percent of CB seniors have graduated from high school, compared to only 62.4 percent of St. Louis Public School students, 69 percent of low-income students nationwide and 53 percent of low-income students living in cities.
99.2 percent of CB seniors have matriculated to college, compared to only 55 percent of low-income students nationwide and 62.2 percent of St. Louis Public School graduates.
College Bound’s first class of students began to graduate from four-year universities in the spring of 2012. 75% of these students are on track to graduate by their mid-twenties, compared to 10% of low-income students nationally.

Mission & Goals

MISSION

College Bound’s mission is to provide promising students from under-resourced backgrounds with the academic enrichment, life skills and social supports needed to succeed in college and careers. College Bound's vision is to end the inter-generational cycle of poverty in the lives of students and their families through college completion and career readiness.

GOALS

  • Provide students and families with the tools to plan, prepare, pay for and pursue a college education
  • Give students the academic foundation to succeed in college-level coursework at selective four-year institutions
  • Mitigate the hardships that disrupt students on their path to college success
  • Prepare students for selective colleges that closely match their interests, aptitude and financial resources
  • Ensure that every student who is admitted to college graduates
  • Engage families as part of the advocacy team that ensures their child’s high school and post-secondary success

Program

COLLEGE BOUND CORE PROGRAM ELEMENTS

College Bound students are provided with high expectations, high support and an unwavering focus on degree completion.During the 2012-2013 school year, College Bound will expand by 30% to serve 599 students in a seven-to-nine-year comprehensive program that begins with students at the end of their 9th grade year and sticks with them through college completion. In addition, College Bound provides 1,101 9th graders and their families with information to plan for postsecondary education through its early outreach and awareness program, Get Your Prep On.

All College Bound programming incorporates evidence-informed, data-driven high school-to-college transition and post-secondary persistence & completion activities proven to develop both the cognitive and non-cognitive resources to empower students with numerous risk factors to succeed in higher education.  The core elements of our programs are:

  • Academic Enrichment, demonstrated through spring and fall break math-intensive workshops; a four-week academic program for rising high school juniors with measurable success in improving students’ skills in math, critical thinking/science and language arts; weekly tutoring; study groups; and skill-building workshops. 
  • College Preparation & Counseling, in closely knit cohort groups, demonstrated through weekly classes focused on critical topics such as college knowledge, goal setting, financial literacy, career exploration and character development; weekly ACT Preparation classes by a certified test-preparation leader; college fairs and tours (focusing on selective and more selective four-year institutions); and a two-day residential college application workshop for rising seniors focusing on creating a list of “best-fit” schools and preparing high-quality college applications and personal statements.     
  • Strengthening Social Competencies, demonstrated through year-round service learning and civic engagement activities that empower students to rise to leadership and experience the power of service to others; frequent exposure to civic, artistic and cultural experiences that prepare students to thrive on a diverse college campus; a one-week institute focusing on time management, study skills, problem solving and academic risk taking; and wellness coaching and financial assistance for students on a case-by-case basis during periods of hardship.
  • Post-Secondary Transition, Persistence & Completion Assistance, demonstrated through weekly classes on making the transition from high school to college; regular contact from CB persistence coaches, financial assistance with books, incidentals, travel and emergencies as needed; annual one-on-one financial aid advising for students and families; a matching program that connects students to on-campus mentors; on-going assistance with college course selection, academic support services, and social networks; and an internship program for collegians to help students transition from college to the workforce.
  • Career Readiness, demonstrated through a career readiness curriculum woven throughout seven-to-nine-year programming; career shadowing opportunities for high schoolers; and  internship opportunities for collegians.       
  • Partnership with Families, demonstrated through extensive personal outreach and follow up to ensure that all families are engaged, informed, and supported during their student’s college-going experience; targeted quarterly workshops on topics ranging from communicating with teens about sexuality to pre-collegiate course selection; a Family Advisory Council that provides feedback and conducts workshops for their college-bound students; an annual financial aid education series; and one-on-one assistance completing aid applications, comparing award letters and selecting loans.

Impact

EVALUATION

Educational researchers interested in identifying and disseminating what works in college success programming have identified College Bound as a model program worthy of further study.  Currently, the internationally recognized RAND Corporation (www.rand.org) is completing a formative and summative evaluation of College Bound’s seven-year comprehensive program, using a quasi-experimental matched pairs design.  The goal of the evaluation is to identify the causative factors responsible for College Bound’s successful outcomes. We look forward to receiving the results in the Winter of 2012.

In addition, in early April 2012 the Educational Policy Institute (EPI) released A Blueprint for Success: Case Studies of Successful Pre-College Outreach Programs, an in-depth look at how 10 programs from around the United States became and remain successful in helping youth prepare for and persist in college.  EPI determined that “College Bound St. Louis exhibits positive outcome data to suggest that students who participate and graduate from the program are more likely to graduate from high school, and enroll and persist in college.”

COLLEGE BOUND’S RESULTS

Through our “whole-student,” braided approach to college access and persistence, College Bound has been able to achieve unparalleled outcomes with students whom, according to statistics, would be more likely to be high school drop-outs, teen parents, part of the juvenile detention system or engaging in behaviors that trend toward lifelong under-employment and unemployment, and exhibiting behaviors that place a decades-long strain on our economy, education, and health care systems.
 

The following externally validated outcomes place College Bound among the highest-performing college access and success programs in the nation:

  • Exceptional High School Graduation Rate:  99.6 percent of CB seniors have graduated from high school, compared to only 62.4[1] percent of St. Louis Public School students, 69[2] percent of low-income students nationwide and 53[3] percent of low-income students living in cities.
     
  • Unparalleled Rate of College Enrollment:  99.2 percent of CB seniors have matriculated to college, compared to only 55 percent[4] of low-income students nationwide and 62.2[5] percent of St. Louis Public School graduates.
     
  • Extraordinary Rate of College Success: 75% of students from College Bound’s first class are on track to graduate by their mid-twenties, compared to 1 in 10 low-income students nationally.[6]



[1]Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education’s 2011 “Report Card” for St. Louis Public Schools

[2]Demography is Not Destiny, Pell Institute

[3]Cities in Crisis 2009: Closing the Graduation Gap, Editorial Projects in Education

[4]Source: National Center for Education Statistics, 2010

[5]Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education’s 2011 “Report Card” for St. Louis Public Schools (35.8% of graduates enter a 4-year college and 31.1% will enter a 2-year college)

[6]Postsecondary Education Opportunity, “Bachelor’s Degree Attainment by Age 24 by Family Income Quartiles,” 1970 to 2008

Growth Plan

COLLEGE BOUND FINANCIAL MODEL

College Bound’s current financial model has been one of steady revenue growth and prudent spending.  In a short period of time the organization has invested its resources to increase its net worth through various assets including careful investments in the stock market, a building purchased through foreclosure, and trademarked process and procedures.

The organization is supported by foundation and individual philanthropy (74%), corporations (15%), and government contracts (11%). The organization communicates with potential donors by illustrating the need to pledge multi-year commitments to ensure future cash flow needs. This has proven successful with over $14.5 million being committed by three philanthropic foundations and two corporations.  Earned revenue streams are on the horizon for the organization. Market research is currently being conducted to determine the feasibility of selling internally developed software to other persistence and college transition firms, which is deemed as cutting edge in the industry.   

The organization’s spending model is based upon United Way’s non-profit “best practices” guidelines of at least 80% of all expenditures being program related, and the remaining percentage being equally allocated to the fundraising and administrative departments.

COLLEGE BOUND GROWTH PLAN 

In the next 3-5 years, College Bound will grow by licensing our programs and expertise via a product bundle.  Areas of new business expansion include:

  • Youth programs that do not offer college access services.
  • Other college access programs that are not achieving outcomes (i.e. high college graduation rates).
  • Individuals or organizations who have identified need and funding and want to start college access program schools.

Growth goals include:

  • Conduct market research to characterize the market and identify target customers.
  • Determine the ideal program to enter market with (student prep, transition, or persistence).
  • Define scope of product (curriculum, training, technical enablement, quality standards & evaluation methods).
  • Define pricing and licensing model.    
  • Develop marketing plan.
  • Establish ongoing support model including staffing model.
  • Develop product (curriculum, training,  technical enablement, quality standards & evaluation methods).
  • Launch and rollout product.

College Bound's goal is to help more students succeed in college. To accomplish this goal, our strategy is to license our programs and expertise via a product bundle we refer to as College Bound in a Box (CBIB).  Our target market for CBIB includes:

  • Youth programs that don't offer college access services.
  • Other college access programs that aren't achieving outcomes (i.e. high college graduation rates).
  • Individuals or organizations who have identified need and funding and want to start college access programs.
  • Schools.

Our operational plan and associated capital requirements to create College Bound in a Box (CBIB) are as follows:

  • Conduct market research to characterize the market and identify target customers. ($30,000).
  • Determine ideal program to enter market with (student prep, transition, or persistence).
  • Define scope of CBIB (curriculum, training, technical enablement, quality standards, and evaluation methods) ($25,000).
  • Define pricing and licensing model ($10,000).
  • Develop marketing plan ($20,000).
  • Establish ongoing support model including staffing model ($ TBD).
  • Develop CBIB (curriculum, training, technical enablement, quality standards, and evaluation methods) ($150,000-$300,000).  
  • Launch and rollout CBIB ($ TBD).

Location of Sites

National Office: 
110 N. Jefferson
St. Louis, MO 63103
Phone: 314-361-4441
List of locations

To make a contribution to a program site:

  1. Click on the "Make a Contribution Now" button and include the name, city and state of the program you would like to support, in the "notes" text box on the organization's donation form, if available.
  2. If a "notes" or "designation" box is not available, write the city and state on your check in the "notes" section or call the national office to designate your contribution to a local program site.

Locations in the following states:

No results found.

Financials

Most Recent Budget

Year Ended:

2013

REVENUE

Corporate Grants: 
$64,000
Foundation Grants: 
$891,935
Government Funding: 
$240,000
Contributions from Individuals: 
$168,551
Special Events: 
$350,000
Program Services Fees: 
$0
Membership Dues: 
$0
Other Earned Income: 
$0
Other Revenue: 
$0
Total Revenue: 
$1,714,486

EXPENSES

Salaries, Related Salaries & Professional Fees: 
$1,108,672
Occupancy: 
$129,805
Travel & Entertainment: 
$19,586
Office Supplies, Printing, Postage: 
$65,201
Telephone & Communications: 
$19,320
Payments to Affiliates: 
$0
Other Expenses: 
$371,902
Other Expenses (Description): 

Program Expenditures (student laptops, summer programming, leadership programs, testing & test prep, tutoring, student transportation, student emergency expenditures, social work consulting), support expenditures.

Total Expenses: 
$1,714,486

NET GAIN/LOSS

Net Gain/Loss: 
$0

Prior Year Actuals

Year Ended:

2011

REVENUE

Corporate Grants: 
$358,592
Foundation Grants: 
$1,342,279
Government Funding: 
$270,374
Contributions from Individuals: 
$113,469
Program Services Fees: 
$0
Membership Dues: 
$0
Other Earned Income: 
$9,529
Other Revenue: 
$18,836
Other Revenue (Description): 
Interest & investment income,reimbursed expenses.
Special Events: 
$414,681
Total Revenue: 
$2,527,760

EXPENSES

Salaries, Related Salaries & Professional Fees: 
$1,087,813
Occupancy: 
$115,793
Travel & Entertainment: 
$6,714
Office Supplies, Printing, Postage: 
$44,651
Telephone & Communication: 
$20,695
Payments to Affiliates: 
$0
Other Expenses: 
$307,760
Other Expenses (Description): 

Program Expenditures (student laptops, summer programming, leadership programs, testing & test prep, tutoring, student transportation, student emergency expenditures, social work consulting), support expenditures.

Total Expenses: 
$1,583,426

NET GAIN/LOSS

Net Gain / Loss: 
$944,334

Major Funders

Unrestricted donations

  • O'Brien-Toan Foundation - $1,000,000 ($400,000 in 2010; $300,000 in 2011 & 2012)
  • Ferring Family Foundation - $500,000 ($100,000 annually from 2011 – 2015)
  • Emerson - $200,000 ($70,000 in 2011; $65,000 in 2012 & 2013)
  • Bank of America - $200,000 ($100,000 annually in 2011 & 2012)
  • Anheuser-Busch - $250,000 ($50,000 annually from 2009 – 2013)
  • Cardinals Care - $250,000 ($50,000 annually from 2008 – 2012)

Program restricted grants

  • Texas Guaranteed –  $150,000 for direct services in 2012; $170,000 for program evaluation in 2011-2012
  • USA Funds - $50,000 in 2012
  • St. Louis Mental Health Board - $50,000 in 2012
  • Express Scripts - $50,000 restricted for programs in 2012

Government

  • Missouri Department of Higher Education - $100,000 in 2012
  • Missouri Community Service Commission - $120,000 in 2012