Blogs tagged with scaling strategies

  • Joe Miller, Wyman Center National Network
    Posted: May 14, 2013

    Lessons in Going to Scale is a newly-launched blog series featuring on-the-ground stories from nonprofit organizations at different points in their scaling trajectory. Hear from S&I 100 CEOs and nonprofit leaders in health, education, youth, and poverty alleviation about the strategies and challenges of developing a scaling model.

    S&I 100 organization Wyman Center explores what it looks like to adapt their Teen Outreach Program® model to settings outside of their network.

    At Wyman Center, we take scaling with fidelity very seriously. The organization has a 115 year history serving children from low-resource environments, and the past 15 years have focused on nationally replicating programs, such as our evidence-based Teen Outreach Program®(TOP). TOP® is a nine-month program for teens in 6th to 12th grade that reduces the risk of problem behavior while helping teens make healthy choices, develop life skills and engage with their communities.

    In order to meet our growth goal to bring faithfully-replicated TOP® into the lives of 100,000 teens in the next five years, we developed a rigorous quality system and infrastructure to both support and monitor our 57 Certified Replication Partners.

  • John Gillespie, Veris Consulting
    Posted: May 10, 2013

    This post originally appeared on the Stanford Social Innovation Review's blog. It is reposted with permission.

    Scaling is critical to any nonprofit looking to increase impact—but of course, it is easier said than done. In addition to gaining board engagement around your strategy and building a focused business plan, organizations must secure sufficient capital—funds that they can raise only if potential donors have a clear enough picture of their growth plan and financials to invest with confidence.

    According to a recent study on the state of scaling impact, conducted by the Social Impact Exchange and Veris Consulting, only 24 percent of nonprofits currently scaling have started fundraising and only 42 percent have a growth business plan. When it comes to scaling, many nonprofits are trying to “build the plane while flying,” when a more disciplined approach is required.

  • Sharon Miller, Renaissance Entrepreneurship Center
    Posted: April 29, 2013

    Lessons in Going to Scale is a newly-launched blog series featuring on-the-ground stories from nonprofit organizations at different points in their scaling trajectory. Hear from S&I 100 CEOs and nonprofit leaders in health, education, youth, and poverty alleviation about the strategies and challenges of developing a scaling model.

    How S&I 100 organization Renaissance Entrepreneurship Center used existing resources and infrastructure to scale geographically and open a fourth site in the Bay Area. CEO Sharon Miller shares what she learned during the process.

    Kasey Arnold was a talented writer and an accomplished corporate marketer who was feeling stuck and unable to generate enough business from her one-person operation. Recently, she was down on her luck as an entrepreneur, barely making enough money to get by and living out of her car. She heard about Renaissance Entrepreneurship Center’s (Renaissance) small business training and support services in her community, and intrigued by the possibility of boosting her bottom line, she signed up for Urban FIRE entrepreneurship class at our newest center in Marin. Through the training she received at Renaissance Marin, Kasey was able to transform herself from a contractor-for-hire to an independent business with a niche market. She was able to hone her marketing message and narrow her focus and her clients. As a result, Kasey was able to secure new clients who truly appreciated her expertise. Recently, she was offered shares as well as a significant hourly rate by a new startup. She now has more work than she can handle and was able to take a vacation for the first time in years.

  • Social Impact Exchange Staff
    Posted: February 11, 2013

    A newly released report by the Social Impact Exchange reveals important findings and implications for nonprofits and funders alike. The State of Scaling Social Impact: Results of a National Study of Nonprofits confirms that even the most effective mission-driven nonprofit organizations are facing the daunting challenge of achieving widespread impact, unable to reach their full potential. Yet nonprofit leaders state that scaling impact is one of the most important activities to address the social problems they are working to solve. Out of more than 400 nonprofits who were part of the research, 79% say they are motivated to scale in order to increase the number of people served, while 58% are motivated to facilitate system change, demonstrating a movement towards more ambitious plans with longer horizons.

  • Geri Stengel, Ventureneer
    Posted: August 21, 2012

    Many corporations are obsessed with scale. It brings efficiencies and effectiveness that small- to mid-sized businesses can't provide. Only a few social ventures -- such as Habitat for Humanity, Teach for America, and Mothers Against Drunk Drivers -- have scaled. But scaling is becoming a mantra for some of those concerned about solving the world's problems in a resource-constrained environment.

    The concept is that more social good could be done if effective organizations scaled. In his book Scaling Your Social Venture: Becoming an Impact Entrepreneur, Paul N. Bloom from Duke University's Center for Advancement of Social Entrepreneurship provides a roadmap for social ventures that want to scale.