Blogs tagged with S&I 100

  • Sharon J. Washington and Elyse Eidman-Aadahl, National Writing Project
    Posted: June 10, 2013

    Lessons in Going to Scale is a newly-launched blog series featuring on-the-ground stories from nonprofit organizations at different points in their scaling trajectory. Hear from S&I 100 CEOs and nonprofit leaders in health, education, youth, and poverty alleviation about the strategies and challenges of developing a scaling model.

    The National Writing Project’s Executive Director and Director of National Programs explain the important distinction between “scale” and “spread” and what it meant for their growth.

    For many nonprofits, working toward scale is an all-consuming focus demanding work and strong execution. Certainly that has been true for us at the National Writing Project. As we look forward to our 40th anniversary year in 2014, we can see the path that led to our current scale and remember some valuable lessons we learned along the way.

    NWP began in 1974 as a single local Writing Project site in the San Francisco Bay Area with the goal of engaging teachers K through university-level in professional development and school reform. Since that time, NWP has grown to nearly 200 local sites located within 50 miles of 75 percent of the nation’s teachers. Each of these sites also has its own dynamics of scale, and now provides professional learning and support opportunities for educators across all curriculum areas as well as out-of-school settings. This kind of growth fits many standard definitions of scale: opening new local sites, serving new populations in existing locations, developing expanded programming and partnerships, growing the budget, and investing in evaluation.

  • Joe Miller, Wyman Center National Network
    Posted: May 14, 2013

    Lessons in Going to Scale is a newly-launched blog series featuring on-the-ground stories from nonprofit organizations at different points in their scaling trajectory. Hear from S&I 100 CEOs and nonprofit leaders in health, education, youth, and poverty alleviation about the strategies and challenges of developing a scaling model.

    S&I 100 organization Wyman Center explores what it looks like to adapt their Teen Outreach Program® model to settings outside of their network.

    At Wyman Center, we take scaling with fidelity very seriously. The organization has a 115 year history serving children from low-resource environments, and the past 15 years have focused on nationally replicating programs, such as our evidence-based Teen Outreach Program®(TOP). TOP® is a nine-month program for teens in 6th to 12th grade that reduces the risk of problem behavior while helping teens make healthy choices, develop life skills and engage with their communities.

    In order to meet our growth goal to bring faithfully-replicated TOP® into the lives of 100,000 teens in the next five years, we developed a rigorous quality system and infrastructure to both support and monitor our 57 Certified Replication Partners.

  • Marcia M. Kerz, The OASIS Institute
    Posted: May 3, 2013

    The following post was written to enhance the discussion that took place during the April 30 webinar, which explored the topic of using evaluation to scale for impact. "Evaluation: What an Organization Needs to Scale for Impact" is now available online.  

    With apologies to the Beatles, developing evidence-based programs that can be taken to scale does not happen in one hard day’s night. Rather, it truly is a long and winding road. At least for this organization.

    OASIS, a national nonprofit organization and member of the S&I 100, is dedicated to promoting successful aging for adults age 50 plus. Our three-fold approach provides opportunities for people to participate in lifelong learning, active lifestyles and community involvement. Through its programs, OASIS puts into practice the findings of the landmark MacArthur Foundation study of Aging in America. Researchers Rowe and Kahn found that the key ingredients for a high quality of life are maintaining a low risk for disease, a high level of engagement with the community and high physical and cognitive function; “It is the combination of all three that represents the concept of successful aging fully.”

  • Sharon Miller, Renaissance Entrepreneurship Center
    Posted: April 29, 2013

    Lessons in Going to Scale is a newly-launched blog series featuring on-the-ground stories from nonprofit organizations at different points in their scaling trajectory. Hear from S&I 100 CEOs and nonprofit leaders in health, education, youth, and poverty alleviation about the strategies and challenges of developing a scaling model.

    How S&I 100 organization Renaissance Entrepreneurship Center used existing resources and infrastructure to scale geographically and open a fourth site in the Bay Area. CEO Sharon Miller shares what she learned during the process.

    Kasey Arnold was a talented writer and an accomplished corporate marketer who was feeling stuck and unable to generate enough business from her one-person operation. Recently, she was down on her luck as an entrepreneur, barely making enough money to get by and living out of her car. She heard about Renaissance Entrepreneurship Center’s (Renaissance) small business training and support services in her community, and intrigued by the possibility of boosting her bottom line, she signed up for Urban FIRE entrepreneurship class at our newest center in Marin. Through the training she received at Renaissance Marin, Kasey was able to transform herself from a contractor-for-hire to an independent business with a niche market. She was able to hone her marketing message and narrow her focus and her clients. As a result, Kasey was able to secure new clients who truly appreciated her expertise. Recently, she was offered shares as well as a significant hourly rate by a new startup. She now has more work than she can handle and was able to take a vacation for the first time in years.

  • Anne Sherman, Social Impact Exchange at Growth Philanthropy Network
    Posted: December 21, 2012

    I’m fortunate in that my paid employment has always been focused on mission-driven work, apart from a few waitressing stints along the way.  At the Social Impact Exchange, our mission is to help create the infrastructure that will lead to more efficient growth capital markets so that nonprofits can attract the funds they need to scale the impact of their work.  

    At times, our mission, compelling and exciting as it is, can feel a little lofty or abstract.  Market infrastructure?  Growth capital?  For nonprofits?